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cycling

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16.09.2015
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cycling
27. September, 20:57 Uhr

Hey Everyone! I made it... and my ass is killing me today! Here's the route we [did!](https://www.google.ie/maps/dir/Ballsbridge,+Co.+Dublin,+Ireland/Shankill,+Dublin/Bray/Kilmacanoge/Ashford,+Wicklow/Wicklow/Arklow/Inch,+Co.+Wexford/Gorey,+Wexford/Wexford/@52.8325713,-6.8439846,9z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m62!4m61!1m5!1m1!1s0x48670ec1077b3405:0x1c1b6f4f4772ee4c!2m2!1d-6.2305235!2d53.3288697!1m5!1m1!1s0x4867a8015fcf4c43:0x2600c7a819b93132!2m2!1d-6.1237578!2d53.2332663!1m5!1m1!1s0x4867a8665bcc7daf:0xa78f3cce4cd37767!2m2!1d-6.1110741!2d53.200903!1m5!1m1!1s0x4867a63df046e6f7:0x307a09018d3b9c12!2m2!1d-6.1361973!2d53.1685967!1m5!1m1!1s0x4867ba5db95eaf31:0xe7bc9772713423a4!2m2!1d-6.1108983!2d53.0107502!1m5!1m1!1s0x4867b0b5d9502859:0x284e79fbf541a3e7!2m2!1d-6.044589!2d52.9808207!1m5!1m1!1s0x4867c3e454c3c58d:0xa00c7a99731d0c0!2m2!1d-6.1599293!2d52.7976935!1m5!1m1!1s0x4867e838f622bbaf:0x1800c7a937eadc50!2m2!1d-6.2359828!2d52.7411344!1m5!1m1!1s0x4867e64fe6265d5d:0x84ac51ccbd4ec8fa!2m2!1d-6.2943022!2d52.6757355!1m5!1m1!1s0x48681b5ee9483a45:0x1733d3eeda104697!2m2!1d-6.460125!2d52.339161!3e1?hl=en) I managed to do it in 8 hours and 20 minutes!! We stopped every 20k or so, and I was taking little breaks a bit more frequently towards the end. I found the first 70k to be pretty fine except for the hills which were very tough. The next 30 were tougher, and the final 40 or so was a real pain in the ass! I really appreciate all the advice I got here, I was hydrating all day and eating non stop and it paid off in the end! Right after the cycle, the only pain I had was my ass and a stiff neck. So, in traditional Irish style, I showered and went for pints! Managed to stay going until 2am and then crashed and burned! Woke up this morning with my still sore ass, a stiffer neck, thighs pretty sore and stiffness in my left knee as well as a major hangover... most of the pain seems to have gone away now though thankfully (except the ass). All in all, it was a great day out and I'm already trying to organise a day out with the more experienced guys! Thank you r/cycling! [Here's the first thread for those of you that missed it! :)](https://www.reddit.com/r/cycling/comments/3m1xbu/i_have_a_140km_charity_cycle_this_saturday_i_have/)

cycling
13. Oktober, 22:06 Uhr

Hey all, I've been going to a certain LBS and had really liked all of the employees I had met so far, but today when I went in there was a new guy there and it was an entirely different story. I went in with my bike, a 2007 Cervelo in really nice condition, the thing practically looks new, and showed him what I thought was a broken shifter. While the part worked perfectly when I got it, this guy told me that "this is what you get when you buy online." I don't have a good deal of money and my $1200 bike is the most expensive thing I own, and I'm damned happy I got what was originally $5500 for $4300 off, and I told him so. He told me that "he has $1200 bikes too!"--oddly I missed those brand new $1200 Cervelos he apparently has on offer when I was shopping. Anyway, he then told me that I would have to leave my bike there because the fork was recalled. Then, he told me that my stack spacer height was above a maximum limit for carbon forks. I smelled bullshit and googled the fork recall and while Wolf Carbon SL forks were recalled, the recall explicitly states the Wolf CL forks are unaffected. I told him as much and he wants to contact Cervelo and see if they want to take my fork back anyway. No thanks. Then I did a brief bit of reading on "maximum safe stack height for Wolf CL forks" and found that my 4cm spacer is absolutely fine. He told me that if he worked on the bike, he would have to take it and couldn't give it back to me in the same condition. This would place me in a more aero and less comfortable position, and I'm unsure how I feel about that. Part of it appeals to me, but I really like how the bike rides right now. Sadly, I think this guy is the store owner. He's checking if my shifter is warrantied and thinks it will be, so I don't know if I'll bring my bike back there or not. I don't really want an argument about stack heights and I feel like they should know more than I can find out on Google in five minutes. So frustrating.

cycling
27. September, 01:47 Uhr

The bike was 15 feet behind me while I was registering. The theif was also planning to steal my saddle and rear hydration kit because my saddle bolt was completely untighted but not removed when I came back to my bike. This was in Waller, TX this morning, northwest of Houston out in the farmland.

cycling
17. Oktober, 00:57 Uhr

Hello everyone, So i was recently in an accident about 3 weeks ago. I live in Chicago and a Valet driver hit me in someone else's car. I was at the crosswalk heading south. He was coming North on a one way and heading pretty fast. He took the turn west and almost hit two pedestrians at the opposite corner from me. He stopped and clearly saw we had the white cross walk stick figure, giving us the right away. Seeing him stopped i then pedaled, assuming, he would let the pedestrians he almost hit go. He then quickly accelerates while continuing to stare at them and hits me directly in the middle of the crosswalk without ever looking forward. All i saw was the side of his head and ear as his bumper approached me. I told him I am fine but that he was going to need to repair my bike. He said he would. So I did not file a police report at the scene, did file one a few days later after he started giving me the run around. He said he would fix my bike, I got an estimate for two double walled rims to be fixed and my handle bars to be tapped again. I got an estimate for $220. He laughed and said this was ridiculous. So i allowed him to pick the bike shop. He dodged my texts for a few days, I went and spoke with him and he said he would meet me at this shop north of the city and that his phone had broke. I traveled 50 minutes north of the city to this shop, where he said he would meet me. He never showed up. His shop said they would fix the damages for closer to 190-200. I have both estimates in writing. I then confronted the man who hit me and said I wanted to take a photo of his license and the insurance information in order to file a police report. He would not give me his license. I spoke with the owner of the valet company and he said he did not want to be involved and that the individual who hit me would take care of it. He only offered to pay me $60, then $70 and finally when the boss spoke with him he said he would pay me $100. The bike has at least $200 in damages. I am not settling for that. So i want to take him to small claims court. But its impossible to get any answers when I call into small claims court. So its sounding like I will have to pay $130 to begin my motion and take this guy to court. I will have to wait several months before I even get to court and then I have no idea how the judge will call it. I do not want to spend $130 and then potentially not get atleast $330 back for my bike damages and court fees. Not to mention i may have to take a couple hours off work in order to go into the court in person, since it is only open 830-430, I work a 9-5. I filed my police report. Ultimately the cop said because he failed to give me his license, this falls under the umbrella of failing to file a report, which falls in the category of a hit and run. Does anyone know if I will definitely win this case if I take him to small claims court? I don't want to spend $130 to only then have the judge decide he only owes me $200 for my bike. I would have been better just taking the $100 he is offering. Basically my question is, how do I handle this? If I take him to court and he is found guilty, will the valet company then be charged with a hit and run on their record? Is there anyway I could convince the valet owner to just pay me for my damages, opposed to him dealing with a hit and run? Or if I take this individual to court will I definitely get my $330 ($200-bike damages and $130-court fees) back? Does anyone have advice on how to handle this? Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.

cycling
09. Oktober, 08:38 Uhr

http://www.nrk.no/ostlandssendingen/_-ma-ta-hensyn-sann-at-20-aringer-slipper-a-do-1.12593555

cycling
07. Dezember, 08:08 Uhr

So Hi! Winter is coming, and with it the need to dress warm. In the morning its sunny but cold, so I usually sweat during the commute to work, evening is just cold, but then once again I bring enough cloth to stay warm, but since I pedal, I keep sweating once again. I can not take showers at work and sometimes I don't even cycle to work but a pub / grocery store / whatever. How do you avoid sweating, cold, and in the same time maintaining "normal" look without all kinds of "cycling" cloth? Edit: to be clear I'm looking for cloth tips (what material are proffered to use, how to layer my cloth, maybe instead of putting everything on me I should "suffer" for the first 5-7 minutes until I build heat), maybe different pedal techniques and etc. Edit2: Thanks everyone for your comments. From what I understood the key is to "suffer" at the beginning, as well as taking shower before going out. Will try that!

cycling
02. November, 11:52 Uhr

https://www.strava.com/activities/424839917/overview

cycling
12. Oktober, 03:20 Uhr

Suffered my first bout of external thrombosis hemorrhoids. It was truly painful. The doc said that it could have been caused, in part, by my longer bike rides. Has anyone else suffered this due to bilking. Has anyone found a trick to minimize the risk of reoccurrence? The pain was debilitating but I do not want to stop biking.

cycling
20. November, 11:58 Uhr

I have a square head. My parents called me "jarhead" growing up. I bought a Bern Watts helmet recently, but I can't comfortably wear it for more than 30 seconds without a headache. The design is fairly round, and my head is fairly square, so it puts considerable pressure on the front and back of my skull. Because it doesn't sit as flush as it could against the sides of my head, it also wiggles a bit. If I sized down it wouldn't fit at all; if I sized up it'd fall right off. Is anyone aware of a helmet with a squarer shape that's under $100? I'm a fan of Bern's helmets, but I assume they mostly have the same shape.

cycling
05. Februar, 13:03 Uhr

our city is a small metro, and in recent years has seen an increase in private vehicles. this weekend we are having a chinese new year celebration and some streets plus a section of the main road is closed off. seen a lot of complaints via facebook status about traffic this and traffic that, blah blah blah. i feel really bad for them and sad as well. why cant more people learn to ride bikes to commute to go from point a to point b whenever possible? it saves time, space and a lot of frustration.

cycling
17. Oktober, 16:11 Uhr

Tl;dr Got pulled over on my bike for no apparent reason. Cop was a bit of a dick. Story ends well. Decided to go out for a nice 20 miler this morning. Working my long ride back up after awhile off the bike. Thought I'd go from my sleepy town to the next sleepy town and back. Got halfway feeling great. Rested for a sec and then headed back the way I'd come. About a mile into the return trip, I heard a car coming up behind me. No worry, I thought. They'll pass me and be on their way. Then I heard a honk. I responded by waving them around me. Then I saw blue lights come on. I pulled over and hopped off the bike to see a large officer get out of his truck. After getting some ID from me and patting me down (that's not a gun in my bike shorts officer), he proceeded to tell me that I couldn't be on the road. I told him (in just the slightest snarky tone) that it was a ROAD bike made for the ROAD. I also reminded him that it was perfectly legal for me to ride there. I don't think he believed me. He told me that if I kept riding on the road he was gonna have to "do something" about it. I asked him a few times what "something" was and he finally said he'd have to get me out of his county, whatever that means. I asked him how I was supposed to get back home (9 miles or so) without riding the bike. Finally he "allowed" me to get back on and go home but said he'd find me if he got any calls about it. I knew people around here thought I was a little weird for riding, but I never thought a cop would get involved. Go figure. At least I didn't get tased.

cycling
05. November, 05:39 Uhr

Hey /r/cycling! This isn't really a question but just wanted to share my awesome experience cycling so far! Just wanted to drop by and say that I've been really enjoying cycling. Two and a half months ago, I was sitting in traffic (I live in the Bay Area) and I realized that I could bike home in the same amount of time without using gas. So I spent a couple of weeks researching possible bikes - originally I only planned on spending about $300-400 for a bike but then for whatever reason, I ended up getting a '09 Specialized Roubaix with Ardennes Plus SL wheels for $950 that was in good condition. At the time, I didn't know anything about bikes but I only knew it was a decent deal due to an experienced friend's recommendation. Anyways this love for cycling came as a surprise to me. I had only planned on commuting in order to save gas and exercise with a cheap bike but I ended up purchasing a much more high end bike and cycling long rides every weekend! Yesterday I just purchased road bike shoes in order to try and go even faster - something I never imagined myself doing two months ago. So far I've had a wonderful experience, the community's been great, I love having the exercise while I'm commuting, I save a lot of money on gas, and it's a whole lot of fun! Thanks for reading :)

cycling
21. Oktober, 13:20 Uhr

http://road.cc/content/news/231075-video-sorry-mate-i-didnt-see-you-day

cycling
29. Oktober, 18:00 Uhr

Dear Reddit community, My name is Andrew Jirik, and I'm a junior in Mgmt & Spanish at Iowa State University. This summer, I was given the opportunity of a lifetime to bike from Baltimore, MD to San Diego, CA as a part of a program called 4K for Cancer (a program of Ulman Cancer Fund, a non-profit organization) and raise awareness and support Young Adults that are currently fighting cancer. From June 5th ~ Aug 16th, with a group of 29 other college students, we will be cycling 70~110 miles a day, while volunteering and connecting with the cancer community at the end of each day of our ride. I personally chose to participate in this ride in memory of my uncle and cousin whom passed away from lung cancer, and for my other uncle and cousin that are currently in the process of overcoming cancer. In order for me to participate in this ride, I am required to raise $4,500 in donations. I have so far raised $1,825, but I am still quite short. I was supposed to participate in this ride last summer, but was unable to due to lack of donations that I was able to acquire, but was given another shot at this summer. I was trying to think of ways to reach out to the community and thought this would be a great place to reach out to my fellow cyclists. Please support the Young Adults and also enable me to participate in this ride of a lifetime by sharing with your fellow cycling family and donating! Thank you so much! http://4kforcancer.org/profiles/andrew-jirik/

cycling
04. November, 17:47 Uhr

I have a friend who constantly half wheels me when we ride together. I have complained to him about it but he always says that he doesn't want to use the brakes if not necessary and "waste energy". Instead if he's getting too close to my rear tire (generally on a downhill) he'll overlap his wheel with mine. It always spooks me when we're descending and i can see him over my shoulder coming up partially alongside because I feel like it limits my options if I need to quickly avoid something. I'm pretty new to group riding so I'm wondering if this is common and acceptable behavior or if I have a legitimate gripe.

cycling
02. November, 22:44 Uhr

a funny thing happened on my Saturday ride. I was heading down a hill two miles from any town when i noticed a cow standing in the road. Being the city boy that I am and really not wanting to spook the cow and have it run into me, I chose to creep by while some guys tried to convince it to head back into the corral. As soon as the cow saw me go by it ran up next to me and ran parallel up the road. It just kept running beside me so I turned around and went back to the guys at the corral that were trying to contain this spirited jail break. as soon as I tried to sneak off, the cow bolted and joined me again for the ride up the hill. We repeated this process several times until finally my new found friend was contained. My Strava map is hilarious with back and forth squiggles through this section of the encounter. My ride was great, but the cow running with me was the highlight of the day. Has this ever happened to anyone else?

cycling
01. November, 21:18 Uhr

Couldn't submit a link, so here you go! https://www.reddit.com/r/bicycling/comments/3r4kcs/psa_how_to_find_your_perfect_bike_on_craigslist/

cycling
26. Oktober, 16:32 Uhr

After an exhilarating ride this morning, accosted by a fellow cyclist for not coming to a complete stop, my curiosity of others opinions and composure has got the best of me. Do any of you: (in no particular order) Favor/support the "Idaho stop?" Background - Idaho stop is a phrase for yielding at stop signs instead of uncoupling and or coming to a stand still at an intersection with a stop sign. It was a law passed in Idaho some one ago that resulted in a ~15% reduction of accidents involving cyclists. More info here https://meggsreport.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/idaho-law-jasonmeggs-2010version.pdf Verbally accost fellow cyclists? Use hateful, racial, ignorant language to accost cyclists and pedestrians you disagree with? Ever get physical with other cyclists, pedestrians, or drivers? Appropriately and correctly use all hand signals? Pedal off at a speed faster than Hermes can fly to escape situations? **EDIT** *for exposing my personal practices and behaviors* * I come to a complete stop at all stop lights. * I may come to a complete stop at a stop sign depending on how safe I feel. I will always yield to cars at stop signs. I prefer to cross just ahead of or just behind a car moving through the intersection just like a Remora. * I always signal ahead of my turn or stop. * I do politely remind people, and thank them for being safe drivers. Hate speech is never acceptable. * I do believe in civil disobedience. So I will Idaho Stop and accept the penalties. I recognize that being a Remora to cars in stop sign intersections may also be a ticket-able offense. * I do not believe anyone can or actually successfully drives 4 city blocks, in traffic, without breaking a law: failure to yield, failure to properly indicate (did you know you are supposed to tap your break lights before using your turn signal? That's the law in Texas ... or was when I learned to drive), stop at the correct line at the intersection, give proper distance to the car ahead of you, not cross the white dashed or solid line, not change lanes over the solid white line, not try to merge into the next lane because you missed your turn and you have to turn now instead of going around the block... * I also believe that many of the people who did not contribute to the title of the post are innocent law abiding citizens. Whether it was a driver that sped, cyclist that rolled through a stop sign, or a pedestrian that crossed when the white/green man wasn't flashing, you've done something illegal in your time and did not deserve the disrespect some hate-speaking autodidact lashed you with. Also, if you didn't contribute to the main thread topic (voting yes/no) I downvoted you.

cycling
14. Februar, 19:57 Uhr

Hey folks! I thought I would put together something for anyone new to cycling. I am by no means an expert, and I have only been riding two years in the Greater North-West so please feel free to add anything relevant that can help our fellow riders take advantage of all the great things cycling offers! First note: This is coming from a commuter’s standpoint with an eye toward riding to work and getting in shape at the same time… Not a racer or a go-fast junkie. The Ride (or whip or bike or spaceship): Be it road bike, commuter, cyclocross, Mountain-bike or electric, this decision is entirely personal. I can say that you will get what you pay for, so figure out the type of bike you want and go from there. My overall impressions are like this: Road bike - lighter but not as comfortable, especially for commuting Commuter - Heavier and a bit slower, but much more comfortable for city riding Cyclocross - My personal choice, a mix of road and mountain bike with comfort and speed Mountain Bike - Unless you are riding off-road on your way to work or using this as your single bike while trailing it on the weekends, steer clear. Big tires and heavy frame make this more of a workout than the others. Electric - I have no experience on this due to the cost. Out of my range =) Accessories For Said Whip: This is a list that could be quite long, so I will keep it to what I deem the essentials… Lights - Get plenty of them, be it day or night. I like using two up front (one headlight and one blinking white), and two on the back (one on frame and other on backpack), both of those blinking red. I want to be seen as my morning commute is pitch black! Fenders - If you are going to ride in inclement weather, these things are just priceless. Some are better than others, but if you are going to ride in the rain, or even just after it, you will never think “I wish I hadn’t bought these”. Bags - Backpack or Pannier - entirely up to you. Backpacks for quick on the go and if your back can handle it, while panniers are perfect for long commutes and are much easier on the body since you don’t actually wear them. Only downside there is you need a rack installed to hold them on the bike. Pedals - To go clip-less or not - this argument doesn’t have a loser, as both options are perfect for someone. I am a convert to clip-less, although there were some growing pains along the way. However, after riding this way for a few months, I just can’t go back to a normal pedal. Locks - Even if you don’t plan to leave your bike anywhere, keep a good U-lock with you anyway. Never know when you may want to stop for coffee along your route! Helmet - This could go under outfit, but I stuck it up here anyway. Get one that fits, is recommended by others, and don’t go cheap. Your brain is on the line! The Outfit: You may see folks in all sorts of attire while you are riding around, and some of them may confuse you. It’s mostly personal choice here as well. If you are only a fair-weather rider, you can pick and choose a bit more randomly, but some type of rain gear is a must-have in my opinion. Waterproof jacket and pants and either shoe coverings or waterproof shoes will make the road much easier to enjoy if the weather turns and you get rained on. Outside of that, go with what is comfortable, stretches somewhat, and isn’t too baggy. Doesn’t need to be lycra, but snug and stretchy will work better and is less likely to get caught in anything whilst pedaling into the great beyond. The Path: No, not the one toward enlightenment - the one to get to your destination! If you know the routes you want to take, double-check them with an app or Google Maps (using cycling as your mode of transportation). You may find that there is a better route to get there that takes road conditions and bike paths into consideration. The Weather: Heat - You can only take off so much! But, there are light options that will help wick the sweat away. Start with what you have (if you have workout or jogging clothes, try those) and go from there. Cold - Layers and layers. Even below freezing is tolerable with enough layers. Insulated gloves are amazing for this. A hat with a facemark will keep you warmer than just a hat. Rain - Dress accordingly (Rain gear preferred), watch out for painted surfaces on the roadway (these are slicker than the roads and you could slide), and stay away from puddles (could be a pothole hidden under there). Ice - If you really must ride in ice or snow, put Zip-ties around your wheels with the connections on the bottom to act like traction devices. Other Random Pointers: Buying new vs used - Buying a used bike for a good deal for a great dealer can get you into a higher class of bike that you might normally be able to afford. Don’t knock it till you check em out. Clipless - Practice a lot before you ride, learn to unclip early, and how to get one foot out quickly. Don’t overdo it - Gradually increase your pace or distance, it will get more comfortable as you go. Eating - Have a light meal or snack at least 30 minutes before riding, as it will help with your energy and will also prevent you from turning into a ravenous wolf when you are done with your ride. Take a snack bar or some other protein with you in case you want to munch halfway through. Get fitted - Both for the bike and the position… It makes a difference! Headphones - This is a hot-button issue depending on who you ask, but I like music. If you are using earbuds though, try to use only one or listen at low volumes so you can hear horns, sirens, or even car engines that are closing in on you faster than you may realize. And make sure local laws do not prohibit said headphones. Safety First! Hills: - Before a grade: Take a swig of water if its a long climb. Might not get another change - Uphill: Shift early, shift often. It will make it easier along the way - Downhill: if you are riding for exercise, don’t stop pedaling on the downhill side Hydrate: take a swig before a hill or rough section of road since you wont be able to during. Maintenance - Routine maintenance should be done, whether by you or your local shop. Treat your whip like the treasure it is and you will be rewarded with years of pleasure Music - If you can do it while being safe (more on that under headphones), music helps your pace and mood considerably! Read - Join /r/cycling/ but don’t forget about other people and places as well. There is a wealth of knowledge out there if you need it. Serial numbers - Take a photo of you with your bike, and record the serial number with the photo. Stolen bikes happen, and you will be happy you had these to give when reporting it. Shifting - Remember to speed up before changing into a higher gear, and ease up on the pressure before doing it. This will allow the shift to happen smoothly without any grinding. Storage - When not in use, store your ride somewhere safe and dry. Doesn’t have to be your bedroom closet, but outside in the elements doesn’t help to promote longevity either. Short hills - Get out of the saddle for short sprints up a hill. You will feel awesome at the top. Tires - New bikes from the factory typically have softer tires that can puncture pretty easy. If you ride on roads that have rock, broken glass, or poorly cleaned, expect to buy new ones (if you don’t have to, you will be happily disappointed). Traffic - Riding with vehicles? Assume they can’t see you and be ready for sudden turns or cars pulling out in front of you. Upgrades - Unless you are getting a great deal on a used bike, don’t worry about upgrades off the bat. Ride a few months and decide then what your priorities are. Windy Conditions - Wind happens, so try to use it to your advantage. A cross wind or the wind at your back is much easier to deal with, if you can plan accordingly. Not always possible!

cycling
17. November, 20:47 Uhr

I'm curious, because I have a 1983 Fuji that I take into my LBS on what seems to be a bi-monthly basis. I'm either getting a tune up (most times), or getting an aging part repaired / replaced. I like the bike, as it was a gift from a family friend, and I don't have the money to buy a whole new bike, but I feel that I am annoying to my LBS with it. So are there any bikes you dread working on, or are an absolute pleasure?

cycling
21. November, 21:45 Uhr

I bought around 5 months ago my first road bike, actually my first real bike. The race type. I started training on a big ass hill, around 4 km on a 15%. It all was going better and better. I hit the road for about 40 km, the first time I managed a decent 1 hour and 30 minutes. I started to ride for longer and longer distances, found some buddies that in some meassure shared my passion and everything was looking great. Until one day. I went to the store to buy some food, a 2 km ride around town. On my way back home, the road was pretty clear. So, why not, I started speeding a little. Not more than 30km/h. On the road there was just one car. On my right, it was the parking lot. The car was moving normally, on my left, in front of me, so I decided to ride past it, following my band. And guess what? The driver couldn't care less about me. With no signal of turning, right when I was trying to move past his car, he turned the wheel so he could enter his parking spot. He hit me, I took a flight off my bike (5 ft in the air, scratching the ground for another 3) and, of course, damaging my bike. He got off his car, yelled at me for breaking his left mirror, got back in his car and drove off. Fortunately, I saw his plates and the police identified him shortly after. All in all, I had no broken bones, but my bike suffered from it. The frame is bent, the gears are a mess, the wheels are looking more like a triangle now. I don't even know if I should try to repair it or buy a new one. For everybody seeing this post, especially the drivers in not-so-developed-countries, please raise your awareness when it comes to cyclists. Check your mirror, always use your signals, keep in mind that you're sitting in a 2 tones vehicle while I brake my ass on a 10 kilos bike. Learn about how you should drive around cyclist, how you should "handle" them. I couldn't ride my bike for about two months now and it looks like I won't be able to until spring comes. Because of someone's negligence, I ended up sitting in bed instead of doing something I truly enjoy and it's not the best feeling. So please, respect the cyclists as much as we respect you. All in all, there should be no king of the roads.

cycling
19. Dezember, 22:54 Uhr

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/young-doctor-ann-formazpreston-killed-in-pymble-cycling-accident-20161219-gteikz.html

cycling
10. Dezember, 01:54 Uhr

This summer I will by cycling over 4,000 miles across the United States in order to raise money and awareness for people with disabilities. I will be traveling with a team made up of about thirty young men and we have each dedicated ourselves to fundraising a minimum of $5,500. All the money that we raise will go directly to The Ability Experience, which is a national non-profit organization that aims to serve people with both mental and physical disabilities. The organization has more than 170 chapters across the country, all with the same mission and the team is made up of men from many of these different chapters. The trip is called the Journey of Hope and it will start in Seattle Washington and we will be cycling all the way to Washington D.C. over a course of 10 weeks. Along the way, we will be staying in church basements, high school gyms, families’ homes, and wherever else people are kind enough to let us stay. The trip is made possible because of these people and donations from people like you. On our journey across the country, we will be stopping by organizations along the way that support people with disabilities in what we call friendship visits. During these visits, we have the opportunity to meet the people that the organization serves and we get to learn about the organization itself. These visits are very important to our journey because it allows us to meet amazing people and keep us reminded of why we are cycling across the country. The true impact of the Journey of Hope can be felt through its programming across the nation. After riding an average of 75 miles a day, you won't find team members napping or preparing for the next day's ride. We will be dancing at a friendship visit with a local group that supports people with disabilities, participating in a game of wheelchair basketball, performing puppet shows to educate children on the abilities of people with disabilities, and learning life lessons that will impact us for the rest of our lives. If you would like to be a supporter of the Journey of Hope and The Ability Experience, please follow the link to donate to my trip possible. All donations are tax deductible. http://ipush.convio.net/site/TR/Events/General?px=1048329&pg=personal&fr_id=1620 If you would like to learn more about The Ability Experience and its mission, please visit our website. http://www.abilityexperience.org Here is a link to the group Facebook page where you can find pictures of my bike and some of my equipment. https://www.facebook.com/groups/904350452977694/

cycling
01. Februar, 16:21 Uhr

http://cyclingtips.com/2015/04/hidden-motors-for-road-bikes-exist-heres-how-they-work/

cycling
17. November, 18:23 Uhr

Hey guys! I am a engineer and avid cyclist, and I want to bring power training to the masses. After getting to train with a power meter for 9 months for my capstone design project in college (I designed and raced a high-speed recumbent), it's always bugged me how expensive power meters are. I can't afford one, can you? It keeps most people from ever getting to experience a whole incredible side of cycling: training with power. So I've started digging for a solution, and after some testing I think I've found something. It would be significantly cheaper than conventional systems, and it would be easy for virtually any cyclist to implement into their setup. It will function using Bluetooth LE so it can be integrated seamlessly with Strava. The only flip side is that, as you might guess, the accurancy would be slightly degraded. That's where I need your help. Beyond doing a fun project for myself, is this something you're interested in? Until the functional prototype is working I don't know exactly what the accuracy would be, but personally I think a power training with even SOME kind of accuracy/consistency would be attractive enough for me to use it. I'm not on Team Sky after all, I just want to measure my progress. So what do you think? Is this something you're interested in? Or is the accuracy paramount and having something lesser would make it useless? For example, what if you were still able to consistently measure changes over +/- 3%? No idea if that's my accuracy, but just food for thought. Any feedback is appreciated! EDIT: Since there seems to be considerable interest in this topic, please shoot me a PM with your email if you'd like to receive updates with the project. I think I may move ahead with the prototype at this point, and when I get it working you'll get to be the first to know!

cycling
07. Dezember, 18:59 Uhr

Hi all, I have just put up a new blog post on my site, would love to know what you think. http://cyclingtipshq.com/41-practical-tips-to-enhance-your-next-bike-tour Thanks! Ben Next year I was planning a bike tour down through Southern France and ending in Barcelona. Due to logistics I have had to call this off, and am instead flying straight into Barcelona and completing some rides around there. Being the organised man I am however I took extensive notes when planning this trip, including a big note to myself of all the best tips I saw from across the web. So what better way to put that to use than to share my best bike tour tips here? Enjoy… Ben N.B. At the time I was not writing a blog so did not list the sources for all of these tips. I note things down in a my own personal style, so many of these will not sound like the original anyway, but if you wish to lay claim to any of these then let me know and I will link back to your site :). I have linked in to some of my favourite sites at the bottom which should further enhance your next bike tour. 41 Practical Tips To Enhance Your Next Bike Tour 1) Take every opportunity to fill up your water bottle. You never know when you’ll get the chance again. 2) Pack cable ties. Perfect for so many running repairs. 3) Never rely on electronics alone if you are on a bike tour into the unknown. Have a backup of cash and maps if you’re not sure if you’ll have access to electricity. 4) A little trip bag is perfect to sit on the top tube, and give you easy access to anything you don’t want in your rear pockets. For example the Topeak Tri Bag 5) On the continent, carrying toilet roll is essential. 6) If you’re caught in the rain, put your foot in a plastic bag before putting on your overtrousers. Makes it so much easier to avoid snags as you put your trousers on. 7) Ship your bike in a free cardboard bike box from your local bike shop. Clad with bubble wrap/pipe insulator and save yourself hundreds of £. You can then dispose of it at the other end. 8) Plastic gloves from petrol stations are great to slip over your normal gloves in the rain. 9) Pack your kit in lots of small bags and write on them what’s inside. Makes packing/unpacking alot quicker and also provides some protection against rain. 10) Take a map. Technology fails, a map won’t! Tent 11) It’s behind you! Some of the best views might not be straight ahead. Stop and have a look around every once in a while. 12) If you wear underwear on the bike, consider swimming trunks instead. They are easier to clean, dry quicker and you can wear normal underwear in the evening off the bike whilst the trunks dry. 13) If you use a sleeping pad, why not try a person sized strip of bubble wrap instead? It can last for as much as 50 nights, and double up as a waterproof liner for panniers or bags. 14) At night, if your feet and head are warm, the rest of your will be warm. 15) For longer tours try and build in a luxury day every so often. A nice hotel and warm shower can give you something to look forward to and help you recuperate. 16) Don’t try to take a rucksack. They become really uncomfortable after a while and can also destabilise you. You should be able to fit everything in to front and back panniers, if not review how much gear you’re planning to take. 17) Keep a small wedge and push it in the front brake handle to stop the bike moving when you are packing the panniers each day. 18) If in doubt as to whether to pack something that you don’t think it essential, consider whether or not you’ll be able to buy it on route. If you can, then leave it behind. 19) Wrap a load of duct tape around your seat post. You won’t even notice it’s there and will find so many uses for it. 20) If you don’t want to carry spares leave your cables long at the end and wind them into into a loop. If your cable breaks then you can at least tie it to get you to the next bike shop. 21) Try a quick tour a few weeks before you head off. Take everything you’re planning to carry with you away for a one night stay to iron out any obvious issues. 22) Buy a lightweight wind up torch and never be left in the dark by an empty battery. 23) A metal water bottle filled up with really hot water and wrapped in a sock makes a great hot water bottle alternative for cold nights. 24) A lid from a yoghurt pot can make a good plug alternative if the sinks at the camp site don’t have one. 25) Down sleeping bags tend to be the best for cyclists. Aim for a weight around 1kg which should see you good down to about -8 C (fully clothed!). 26) If a restaurant is busy then eat there. If it’s full of locals then it’s probably good. 27) Paint your tent pegs a bright colour before you leave so they are easy to see when you pack up each day. 28) If you are going on a really long tour, consider a steel bike. You are more likely to find a welder in remote parts of the world than someone who can deal with cracked carbon. 29) Try to plan your tour so it is not all about the distance. There will be things you just want to stop and see. The idea of travelling is to experience things, meet people and reflect. 30) In non English speaking countries try speaking to the youngsters, they are more likely to have learned English. 31) Make a check list of the things you absolutely cannot do without and double check it everyday before you leave (wallet, phone, passport, camera etc) 32) Have at least one day when you haven’t planned anything at all. Just amble along until you get somewhere interesting, then stay there. 33) Double tape your handle bars for better grip and less numbness. 34) Make your tea or coffee the night before and leave it in your flask. Should be still warm in the morning and saves waiting for the stove to be fired up. 35) Buy decent quality water bottles so your water doesn’t taste of plastic and stays cool. I suggest the Camelback Podium Chill. 36) If you plan on shaving, take oil not foam. The bottles weigh only 20g, and is better than just using soap. KIT! 37) Swiss army knives were designed for this kind of adventure. Bottle opener, small knife, screwdriver, scissors. No better practical multi tool. 38) Cheap earplugs hardly add any weight, but are great for getting sleep at a busy campsite. 39) VISA debit cards are accepted in more cash machines around the world than any other. 40) Buffs are brilliant. They can keep your head warm, double as a scarf off the bike and work as an eye mask on a bright camp site. Check them out here. 41) Treble check your camping spot before you leave. The worst miles are heading back to pick up something you’ve forgotten! Further Reading These are sites I had bookmarked when doing my research, I hope you find them useful. Dave’s Travel Pages A great site, and this page is particularly handy showing everything you’ll need for a one week tour. The Ultralight Cycling Blog Mr Lik is a man with an obsession. To travel as light as possible and tour as much of the world as possible. Some of it is a bit extreme, but this blog is an incredible read with amazing tips throughout the site. BikeTouringTips.com The Daddy of bike tour sites. It may not be the best presented, but if you can get past the superficial and dig in you with find everything you will ever need to know about completing a bike tour. Struck.US An absolute wealth of information on this site on all kinds of bike tour subjects.

cycling
10. April, 17:20 Uhr

Just wanted to share this with you all. My speed was slow (13mph), but I did it. I stayed hydrated and used high GI snacks to keep the energy flowing. I've lost 60 pounds over the last 8 months. At first it was discouraging to get passed 20-30 times by guys like the rest of you, but after seeing me on the trail a bunch I started getting thumbs up and smiles back, which is encouraging. Once I lose another 50 pounds I'll be attempting a 100 mile ride. Love cycling. It's changed my attitude about exercise. Edit: Thanks everyone. I'm only encouraged more. For those who asked, I've put about 2100 miles on a stock Trek Shift 4 - best bike for big guys (overbuilt hybrid). I sit more upright than I will want to in another 4 months, but it's been great for starting out.

cycling
30. November, 14:37 Uhr

I hate jogging. I played soccer for 15 years, and I think it ruined jogging for me. Unless I'm chasing down some asshole (or a scoring opportunity) what is the point of running anywhere? Decided cycling is probably my best route for cardio exercise. It's scenic, it's very community-oriented, and it's not running. Plus I just witnessed the UCI Worlds in person this year. Holy shit! Changed everything I ever thought about bikes. Anyway, very excited to be here. Carry on with your days and nights.

cycling
02. Januar, 05:00 Uhr

Go for a night ride in the rain on 1/1/2017, wife gets a flat. Thankfully had enough CO2 to get it home so I could patch it indoors.

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