Suchergebnisse für Touren
cycling


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cycling
13. Januar, 19:35 Uhr

First part of the post: Last year during July I did my first long bike tour through three Balkan counters. [Here's](https://www.reddit.com/r/cycling/comments/90j9qk/just_cycled_solo_768km_through_serbia_bosnia_and/?utm_source=reddit-android) the link. On that tour, I used my old steel bike which has touring friendly pair of Alexrims Y2000 wheels, each with 36 spokes. That bike is heavy. At least a few kilos heavier than my road bike B'twin Triban 540. After the tour, I realised that almost half of the things I carried were unnecessary. So, for this year the plan is to tour on B'twin. But, the catch is in wheels. As you can guess, on the bike is a pair of Mavic Aksium wheels, both 20 aero spokes, straight pull, front radial laced. What concerns me is the fact that a spoke snapped on rear wheel, on cassette side, during the decent on mountain Kopaonik (I hit the small but deep hole on the road when spoke snapped) during the three day ride. At the time of snapping the bike was empty without bags or weight attached. Previously there was a tent and a front bag, both not more than 5kg. But, the spoke was damaged. Damage could be seen as a maybe half a millimeter wide straight cut into steel. How that damage got there, I'm not sure. The spoke snapped in half on the exact same spot as the damage was. So, is it wise to ride a 1000km light tour on that pair of Aksiums? I've replaced the spoke, rode it a lot of times since then. Aksiums are now with Conti Ultrasport 28c. Haven't had any problems. Will it handle touring with 8-10L saddle bag, frame bag and a dropbar bag? Second part of the post: I'm new at light touring. I'll figure out things I need to carry, but I need the information from experienced riders where and how do you sleep on light tours? Do you use tent? A bag? Is it possible to carry only a bag and find a shelter and sleep? To me, that seems like a good option. On my previous tours, during warm summer nights, a tent wasn't really that necessary. It was great anti-bug protection, though. Can I ditch a tent and still be fine? What are your thoughts? Thanks for reading! I'm 23 male, usually around 88kg. Height 189 cm

cycling
17. Juni, 19:47 Uhr

I need a bike which I can use for everyday commuting needs, but I would also like to make a tour of a few hundreds km, so it should be solid, reliable and easy to maintain. I was looking at both the [Riverside 120](https://www.decathlon.fr/velo-tout-chemin-riverside-120-id_8405304.html) and the [Triban RC 120](https://www.decathlon.fr/rc120-gris-abyss-id_8505088.html) from Decathlon. The Riverside is much cheaper, and I would need to change crankset and chainrings and add a shifter for it, a modification which will cost about 80€. On the Triban I would need to change the wheels with some tougher 36 spokes. On both I would need to buy racks, panniers, mudguards, better tyres and pedals. The Triban offers better aerodynamics and better power input, which is good for commuting, but panniers and bags would kick aero out of the window. Also should be considered its aluminium frame and carbon forks are lighter but less resilient than steel (Decathlon has a lifetime warranty on frames and forks, but if something happens on the road steel is much more solid, especially considering the carbon fork has holes for the racks, which are a weaker point in the structure, and it needs a torque wrench and more care than a steel fork). The bikes are recommended to riders below 100 kg, I would not be heavier than that even with the bike fully loaded. I considered proper touring/adventure bikes from other brands, but they are so much more expensive than these. That said, I'm open to suggestions if the price is not too high (preferably less than 900€), but I would need to leave the bike locked somewhere from time to time, so maybe an expensive groupset would get unwanted. So in conclusion, is the more powerful riding position on the Triban worth twice the price (after the customizations I plan to do)? Can the Riverside be ridden for hundreds km or is it only feasible on a bike with a more sportive geometry (keep in mind in both cases the bike should be loaded, so the aero advantage would not be much)?

cycling
29. April, 14:03 Uhr

Hi, I'm trying to get into cycling although I know next to nothing about what to look for when buying a bike. Where I live, the roads are paved although not always great quality - sometimes a lot of debris too and is why I'm not looking at race road bikes. There aren't any steep mountains, however the road is never flat, it's almost always on an incline. I plan on using this bike for cardio fitness, city/country riding, long rides and potentially a 1 month+ long cycle tour this summer. (More in future if all goes well) I'm really looking for a all-in-one solution and wouldn't mind buying an extra set of tyres specifically for road riding in future if the thicker gravel/touring tyres aren't optimal. I have these 3 options selected and hope someone could offer some extra input? Budget is up to 1k, although ideally less. I'd rather buy something good, once. This is my personal favorite: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/verenti-substance-ii-105-adventure-road-bike-2017/rp-prod164830 Another Gravel Bike: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/fuji-jari-2-3-gravel-bike-2018/rp-prod166365 Touring Specific Bike: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/fuji-touring-road-bike-2018/rp-prod166407

cycling
06. Dezember, 22:00 Uhr

Around February I'll be looking to update my bike situation, as I have some new goals and interests. Right now I commute on a Surly Cross Check that's built up as a flat bar, 1x9 commuter. It's a perfect commuting bike for me (15ish miles roundtrip in NYC). I'm planning on doing some light touring, as well as some long gravel rides and maybe dipping my feet in some road events in the spring/summer. I want to sell the Surly and buy a bike that will best fit those categories. So really looking for the best possible commuter/light tourer that wouldn't be totally absurd in a Cat 5 and maybe Cat 4 race. My total budget will be around $1,600. My 'must-haves' are disc brakes, clearance for at least 38mm tires, 2x drivetrain, and minimum tiagra or apex components. It would also have to be able to accept a front rack. I'm currently considering: *All-City Space Horse *Surly Straggler *RLT 9 (if i can find a 1 star somewhere) Anything that I'm missing, that folks would recommend? I'd be happy to look in the used market too. Anyone have experience using these bikes for these riding styles? Cheers.

cycling
22. Juni, 22:38 Uhr

I live in Hessen, Germany and I'm planning to do a cycling tour of circa two weeks in the upcoming summer holidays. However, I haven't really decided on the itinerary yet. Preferably, I'd like to go somewhere where I can do a little trekking tour on my own before I head back. I'm a sucker for beautiful, wide and natural landscapes. I did a trekking tour in Norway with a traveling group once and I would like to resurrect this amazing experience alone, without being restricted to a group scedule. I'd also prefer if said destination didn't have too much tourism. Does anyone know an optimal trekking tour place near or in germany that can be realistically reached in a two weak cycling tour? Thanks in advance! I'm also not quite sure which type of bike I should use for my tour. I know a bike without suspension is more optimal for longer distances, but I feel like a hardtail would be the better choice in case I come across bumpy tracks (especially since I want to do a trekking tour). What would be the better choice and can anyone recommend me a certain bike for this? (It shouldn't be too expensive) Again, thanks in advance!

cycling
03. Mai, 04:03 Uhr

My wife and I are preparing for an extended bike tour in England, France, and Italy, and we're looking to buy touring bikes while we're in London (about May 8 to May 20). So, several questions: 1. What are some good websites/forums/shops to look for used bikes in and near London? It seems like Craigslist doesn't see much use, but there are some listings on Gumtree. Any other sites I should check out? 2. What's a decent/fair price for a secondhand touring bike? We're not looking for the nicest bikes in the world, but rather trustworthy machines in good shape that will carry us thousands of miles across Europe this summer. Obviously the price will (and should) vary substantially between, say, a 1980s Japanese tourer and a recent-model Trek 520. 3. Anything else I should know as I hunt for these bikes? For example, I imagine it might be cheaper to buy bikes in a smaller/less expensive city rather than in London itself. But is this worth the hassle of traveling, and the smaller number of bikes on offer outside the capital? 4. Does anyone in this subreddit have a bike they're looking to sell? My wife is 1.65 meters tall, and I'm 1.87 meters tall. PM me if you're interested :) 5. We're looking at a mini-tour from London to Oxford to Cambridge to Dover before we take the ferry to Calais. Any roads/routes/charming towns we mustn't miss along that itinerary?

cycling
09. Oktober, 04:36 Uhr

This summer I did some experiments to optimize my cycle-touring range. Now I just completed the 4 river bike-route in Korea, leading >600km from Seoul to Busan, diagonally across the country. Despite heavy rain on the last third of the tour, the whole ride only took me only 56 hours and I rode alone without external support. Here are some key aspects how I achieved this ride (and a couple other fast ones). To put it into perspective: Being a mountaineer, cycling is not my main sport but I do cover quite some distance in my everyday life and have a decent stamina. **Key Aspects:** - Try to stop as rarely as possible. I ate, drank, took pictures and took on/off my raincoat while riding. Avoid navigation stops too. Stopping costs time and even worse: breaks the rythm. - Don't go too fast or you'll have sore legs, avoid high intensity - Don't bring panniers (aerodynamics, weight) or a backpack (at least my back hurts after a couple hours). Stick to saddle bags and limit lugguage big time - Continuously eat lot's of carbs. If you feel hungry it's already too late. - Camping is not an option (too much luggage and too much time). **The Bike** For the long and fast tours, I ride a road-bike with comfortable seat position (Canyon Endurace). I have a Saddle bag and a small bag on the handle-bar with my valueables. **The Luggage** Bike jersey, pants and gloves, compact rain coat; SPD-Shoes; T-Shirt, very light shorts and a set of underwear for the evenings-, mobile phone, power bank; wallet, oversleeves for legs and arms, tooth brush and paste, repare set, spare tube, pump, lock, sunscreen, 2x600ml liquid, some snacks. Things I passed on: Rain pants, Non-SPD-shoes, shower-equipment and so on... **The Speed & Time-Management** In the flat without wind, I try to ride around 26km/h (16mph). It is important, that the speed "feels boring" as you need to keep it up for a long time and multiple days. During the whole day, I try to make 20km for every hour I am on the road (including breaks, minor hills, traffic lights and so on - only exception: when riding mountains with >200m elevation gain). I usually didn't start terribly early (around 8am) and kept riding until it got dark. Often I feel very good in the evenings and ride until 9pm. Good lights required for this. Lots of sleep is also a key aspect to stay fit for me. 10 hours are optimal for me on these tours. **Psychological Approach** I never display anything other than my speed on the bike-computer. Looking at the daily distance makes me count kilometers - nothing worse than that. I try to focus on the landscape, other riders or whatever. Just enjoy myself as much as possible. Trying to get the most kilometers out of a day, it is important to have several options as where to go to in the evening. Having the budget to stay in most hotels certainly helps here. **Sore legs** For multi-day trips it is important to consider the fact that you need to ride on the next day as well. For me it is very important to know my limits not to have a break-down after an overly motivated first day. For me speed and steep hills seem to be the killer. Therefore I try to avoid high intensity at any cost, even if it means to push my bike up steep hills every now and then. I did a couple one-day trips from home to get a feeling for my limits. **Food** During the day I only eat food that I can consume on the bicycle (sometimes I get proper lunch though). Mostly power bars and other high-carb foods (e.g. Gimbap here in Korea). Bananas also work very well. In the evenings I paid a lot of attention to eating lots of carbs and also plenty proteins. Generally I have to force myself to eat, eating when hungry is a bad idea at least for me. Additionally I have coke or energy drinks in one of my bottles and water in the other one. ---------------------------------------------------------------- The stats of this particular tour for anyone interested: Day 1: 265km, 1700m elevation gain, averaged 24km/h (Mostly flat with some serious mountains at the end, perfect weather and fresh legs) Day 2: 198km, 900m elevation gain, averaged 23km/h (Mostly flat with some short nasty steep hills and some dirt/gravel sections that slowed me down. Stopped by rain in the evening, legs felt so-so) Day 2: 146km, 800m elevation gain, averaged 24km/h (again some short nasty steep hills and continuous rain until 2 hours before the finish, finished the ride at 3pm, legs felt very good)

cycling
08. September, 08:46 Uhr

www.bike-nz.com/tour/new-zealand-lifestyle-cycling/ New Zealand Road Cycling CYCLING TOURS IN THE SOUTH ISLAND AND NORTH ISLAND New Zealand is a country of great beauty: glacial mountains, fast-flowing rivers, deep, clear lakes, hissing geysers and boiling mud. There are also abundant forest reserves, long deserted beaches and a variety of fauna such as the kiwi, endemic to its shores. New Zealand is ideally suited for cycle touring due to its compact nature. Split into two very different islands, New Zealand is easily covered in a great 17 day tour to hit the highlights on and off the beaten track. if you are on a limited time frame go straight to the South Island for the best scenery straight from the Lord of the Rings. Our tours of small, personal groups are designed for both experienced and beginner cyclists and are accompanied by our knowledgeable guide who is always nearby. We aim for our New Zealand cycle tours to deliver amazing views, excellent excellent cycling and activities, quality accommodation and great local cuisine. Mountain Biking Adventures New Zealand,Mountain Biking Adventures Wellington,mountain biking tours NZ,Queenstown mountain biking trails,Wellington Mountain Biking,Wellington mountain bike events,New Zealand mountain bike events,NZ Off Road Adventure Mountain Bike Tour,New Zealand Off Road Adventures,New Zealand Off-Road Mountain Biking, mountain bike tours usa, Cycling Vacations usa, New Hampshire Bike Tours,usa cycling tours, usa bike tours, road cycling tours usa, road cycling events usa,cycling events Maryland,cycling events Nevada,cycling events New Hampshire

cycling
24. April, 18:26 Uhr

Hi all! Looking for some opinions. Me and the girlfriend are quite new to the serious cycling world. I've been riding a bike for the past 2 years, a Cannondale CAAD8 Claris which was nice and fast but felt a bit too fragile for me at around 100kg. The girlfriend has only recently gotten into bikes. In January we both bought a Triban RC 500 (https://www.decathlon.co.uk/triban-rc-500-disc-road-bike-black-sora-id_8554410.html). We would like to start getting into touring on mixed terrain and was curious if I would be better off replacing components on the current bikes or get touring/adventure frames like Surly or Salsa(would love suggestions for a do-anything frame) . My main complains with the bikes are tyre clearance which is 35c max, Carbon forks which make me not want to put front panniers and the really high gearing. Sorry for the long post and looking forward to opinions. Tl;Dr : me and the girlfriend want to get serious about touring. Should we upgrade components or start with a new frame and build from there? PS: can't throw a lot of money at it at once

cycling
11. Oktober, 10:03 Uhr

Hi /r/cycling! I have an old Giant road bike from ten years ago. It's a "compact ocr" model, exactly [this one.](http://www.rebikecumbria.co.uk/communities/4/004/012/574/644/images/4627706261.jpg) It has a campagnolo cassette and tektro brakes. I got it when I was 16, and did not use much for 8 years due to my studies and frequent moving. I am not and was never into competitive cycling but nowadays I enjoy using it for day tours in the country side. To make it more practical, I've added a light rear rack fixed on the axle on which I put a change of clothes, some food and a few tools. Now I find this bike rather comfortable or rather I'm used to it and I have been dabbling with the idea of using it for longer rides, tours that last at least 3 or 4 days, with a lightweight tent. I've already ridden it once for 30km with a rather loaded rack (two bags full of clothes) and in steeper descents I felt that the rear triangle became a bit too wobbly at higher speeds (45-50km/h), so I slowed down. So my question is: did I put myself in danger? What is the maximum charge I could put on this safely? Is that bike usable as a lightweight tourer?

cycling
06. Mai, 17:36 Uhr

I'm a years-long roadie and sometimes MTB rider who is becoming interested in touring. I have been casually checking out touring bikes and keep coming back to the Masi Giramondo. I don't know anything about Masi bikes, other than what I've read online. Tourers, do you have an opinion about it? I would be looking at 80km-160km a day for riding, and only for less than a week at a time. So, not around the world level by any means. Are there other bikes I should check out?

cycling
24. Juli, 04:51 Uhr

I just got a used road bike (Trek 470 aluminum racing, from 1998), and most of the hardware was working fine. However, the shifters were gummed up and needed to be replaced. Since the bike is 2x7, I had to replace it with Shimano's Tourney shifters, since it seems like they're the only ones that come in 7-speed. Thing is, it also seems that those are the bottom-of-the-line model. When they need to be replaced down the line, I'd like to upgrade, but I don't know if it's worth it, since I'd have to switch to an 8 or 9 speed cassette, which means I might have to replace the derailleur, the wheel, and maybe even the chainrings. Is there enough of a performance difference to justify the extra money and work here? Moreover, is it worth upgrading to 9 speed in general (or is it even feasible)? Or am I better off sticking with 2x7 with Tourneys?

cycling
17. April, 10:11 Uhr

Hello Cyclists, ​ Where I am I don't have a chance to try out either kind of bike before purchasing and I'm torn. I have to often ride on bad quality tarmac roads with potholes. I know I need something with strong wheels ( preferably 36 spokes) to take my weight - 285ish lbs - that will be fun and comfortable to ride for a few hours at a time. I don't plan to actually do any unsupported tours nor any races. Just rides singly or in groups for fun. I fear that a touring bike might feel sluggish to ride and not be as much fun. And most gravel bikes seem to have 32 spoke wheels only so I'm not confident they'll bear my weight comfortably. I'm not too keen on purchasing a bike and changing the wheel straightaway either. ​ So I'm sort of lost between the two options. What does your experience say?

cycling
09. April, 05:57 Uhr

Hi folks, I am a big bicycle touring lover and cycling across Europe 6-7 days in each month. My biggest dream is to ride around the world. In order to realize my dream, I would like to ask all of you to give your support on my youtube channel. BTW- Here is my latest tour in March. [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMLAeXrh8Vo](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMLAeXrh8Vo)

cycling
13. August, 23:07 Uhr

Hello everyone, I am planning to ride from San Luis Obispo to Orange County towards the end of October and wanted to see if anyone has done a similar trip, and if they could give me any insight. I plan on taking 4-5 days to complete said ride and camping along the way. I plan on doing a lot of riding over the next few months to build up some endurance. What kind of gear should I expect to bring for a trip down the coast in October and what are some must haves when touring? I just purchased a Salsa Marrakesh and I’m excited to put some miles on this tank. Thank you all in advance.

cycling
09. April, 17:33 Uhr

Hi folks, Planning a coastal tour of Ireland, where I will be camping along the way. I'll be using a bob Ibex trailer between two of us, (each towing alternate days). I've done some long cycles before but previously on my carbon road bike between hotels for a weekend at most, so very little to carry. This time though I will be on the road for a few weeks and have tent, clothes etc hence trailer. I would be very wary of using my road bike for that long and pulling a trailer sounds like a recipie for trouble. So I need a different bike. I have an old mountain bike frame, which is quite heavy with heavy suspension forks (which are stiff). I would need to buy new wheels, cassette, chainring, break pads and maybe a couple of other things. My question is as follows, would doing that type of trip on a mountain bike be hell (happy to go slow ) and seen as I just have a frame would I be as well to just buy a new bike? Any advice would be appreciated

cycling
05. Oktober, 12:37 Uhr

I have a good touring bike but I'd like to find a bike that I can just grab, jump on and do a quick 70-100km. As well, I'd like to try a few Gran Fondo events next year. Not for the competitiveness but just because I like the idea of riding in a marshalled group event. I'm not a real bike weenie but I think what I want is an endurance frame road bike. Or, will a cyclocross bike do the trick? I'm in my mid-50s so I'm not looking to be hunched over in a super aggressive position for 4 hours. I'd like to spend around $1500 and I would consider used. I have a preference for steel frames for ride quality and especially if I'm buying a used bike. Recommendations?

cycling
09. Juli, 00:50 Uhr

I've had a bunch of bikes over the years, but mostly just whatever I could get my hands on. I'm looking to buy a bike for daily city use (3-season), but I also plan to do a bike tour of Iceland next summer, and possibly more in the future. I'm not sure I can justify buying two bikes, unless I pick up a cheap beater just for the trip. I'm not looking for specific brands or models, just for info on what I should look for, or to avoid, when buying a bike that's reasonable for both purposes.

cycling
28. Mai, 22:05 Uhr

I currently have a handmedown trek 7100, i wanna say no older than 2005. I use to ride a older Trek USPS road bike when i was a teen and loved it. The trek 7100 i have is a different experience, not as fast but feels more comfortable in certain areas. I have been wanting to do a long distance travel trip via bicycle once i get back into the groove of cycling a bit. With the 7100 i have i am curious if there is anything i can upgrade to improve ride quality, i have heard there are certain tubes that work better somehow but not sure where to look. other things anyone recommends is greatly appreciated. I am kinda budget focused if i can be. This bike is all stock from the shop when my father bought it, and i dont believe has ever been serviced, i lubed the chain, but done nothing else. Nothing seems too off for me, so i am not too concerned. ​ I am also curious if maybe getting another road bike like i had before would be worth it, some sort of hybrid that allows for tires with more tread as there might be a lot of dirt roads i may encounter. any advice on what to search for on craigslist would be great, its hard for me to distinguish cheapo bikes from quality ones unless its incredibly obvious. Seems like nearly every bike manufacturer also makes crap bikes you find at Walmart.

cycling
22. Mai, 01:36 Uhr

Hey fam! Long time cyclist here , not the biggest ride in the world but I have my first 85M tomorrow , Hosteling overnight ! Should be fun. Might drag it for a few days. hmm :) 1/4 of the ride through a national park (never been!)

cycling
10. Mai, 09:31 Uhr

So here is the thing, I went to check my vacation time, and to my surprise I have 5 weeks vacation time; wat. So what do I do with it?... cycle of course, so I just came with this wild plan to cycle from Zurich to Porto. I have never toured before, so I don't know what to do, I have 4 bikes. 1. XC racing MTB, carbon everything, expensive AF, but gives a very nice ride, that bike would be the best suited to this trip, but being that expensive is a problem :( finding replacement parts would be a nightmare as well. 2. XC winter commuter MTB, I can upgrade it to tubeless, 2x10 speed Deore and XT mix drivetrain, aluminum and steel, it's a moderate bike without suspension, it weights a lot, it's slow. 3. racing road, carbon everything, forget it, it might fit 32mm tyres but still, that thing hits a pothole and explodes. 4. [trash bike, made out of trash](https://imgur.com/a/L14dQmc), full steel but somehow surprisingly light, friction shifters, fixing it is cheap AF, 35mm tyres, surprisingly fast but clunky; I love that thing, it's probably my most ridden bike, it just works, even if it needs a kick or two to start up. What tyre width should I use?... It seems that there are roads everywhere and everything is paved but when I google shit out where I want to go using google images, specially in Spain,[the roads literally seem carved by a goat](https://www.ciclotraveling.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/430_CaminoDelNorte2007.jpg), google street map puts a road, I think something is off, but I cannot be sure. Now here is the thing. 1. How do I go about sleeping?... I cannot be sure how many kms I can cover, so I cannot book in advance; I am assuming around 80-100km per day being conservative, should I bring a hammoc and something to protect myself from the rain so I can sleep in the forest?... how cold is it in early autumn? specially around Switzerland. 2. I don't have much money, what money saving tips I can use?... 3. I'd need to find a bike box in Porto, how do I go about that?... 4. How about theft?...

cycling
26. Juli, 09:44 Uhr

Hello all. I'm on a budget, and this Calibre Dark Peak (Go Outdoors own brand) is on sale + further discounts. They have some good reviews, seem to be quite well equipped and fit into my enthusiastic casual road biking and light touring, once I've changed the 40c tyres to something more road friendly. Ie, I can road bike it, but I can load up a rear pannier and go on a little weekend away. [What do you think?](https://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/calibre-dark-peak-adventure-bike-p347153)

cycling
02. Mai, 08:25 Uhr

Please delete if not allowed, but I am very proud \(and jealous... I am still struggling through 15\-mile rides at the moment\). I mention his age in the title only because he has been approached by people who say they're far too old for that kind of thing. And he says, "rubbish" haha. [Bicycle Touring for Beginners: Train and prepare for your cycling adventure in as little as six weeks](https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bicycle-Touring-Beginners-prepare-adventure/dp/1980915628/) Edit: [and the Kindle version!](https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bicycle-Touring-Beginners-2018-adventure-ebook/dp/B00J5LY30S/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1525268075&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=Bicycle+Touring+for+Beginners%3A+Train+and+prepare+for+your+cycling+adventure+in+as+little+as+six+weeks)

cycling
20. März, 18:25 Uhr

I am having a difficult time finding a wheelset with the requirements below. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. 700/29 **32 spoke** 100/135 spacing with QR 6 bold disc Rim width for 32-35c tires $400-600 This is going on a commuter/light touring build. I can’t seem to find anything. Either 24-28 spoke or mtb spacing is all i can find. Not much luck looking at cross wheels ether. Is this a unicorn wheelset?

cycling
16. März, 04:46 Uhr

Hellllllo cyclists. I'm a former year-round commuter cyclist (Vancouver) who's been off for a year or two due to: 1. Having a baby, 2. My body complaining (hips, legs really tight, wrists bothered by bearing a lot of my weight), 3. My bike falling out of maintainable condition (it's an old-school Nishiki 18-speed with 28mm tires). I want to get back into season-irrelevant cycle commuting, but I need a new bike and am suffering from choice-paralysis, so I'm looking for some well-reasoned recommendations. Here's what I'm after: * I want to be comfortable on my bike. A lot of that I assume is fit, so I want it to fit me really well (I'm 6'4 and like a 61/62cm frame). * Mostly I'm going to commute with it (40mins each way), often in the rain (I want disc brakes). * I'm going to carry my laptop back and forth from the office (so at least one waterproof pannier). * I want to ride on forest paths (I don't care about jostle, so this is just about tires). * I want the option of touring with it once every year or two (so maybe two panniers and/or a rack). * I want to put a child seat / trailer on it. * I'm used to a slow gear ratio of 0.956 and a fast gear ratio of 3.57, so ideally I don't lose either end of that range. I like to go as fast as I can down bridges. * I like to switch up my wrist positioning a lot (end of the drops, front of the drops, sides of the bars, middle/top of the bars), but I also like to always have my fingers on the brake levers. On my past two bikes I put in lever extensions so I could brake while on the top of the handlebars. So interrupters or suicide levers or whatever you call them are important to me. * I want to spend between 1k and 1.3k CAD Help me find a bike! Preferably I want to just go somewhere and buy it and do a few mods afterwards. Not really interested in building up from scratch. Thanks!

cycling
28. Februar, 11:17 Uhr

The title might seem a little ambiguous so let me unpack it some. I plan to do a 1000 mile trip in May and would like to know how I can get the most out of the riding in an effort to improve my V02max, FTP, aerobic, and anaerobic endurance. Is it stupid to think I could consider this trip a "base" building exercise or something of a personal training summit? I haven't had much opportunity to put in a lot of long distance efforts considering where I live, so I'm hoping this trip will bring up my overall fitness and give me a solid base to build on. At most I'll do 140 miles in a day and others as little as 60. I hope to complete the trip in 10 days. That might be asking for a lot, but I think depending on how many miles I do in a day, the type of terrain, how much rest I get could all be factors that, if combined correctly, could potentially enhance various facets of my fitness. I'd like to know what I could work on during the time on the bike that would give me an advantage later on in training. Things like stroke efficiency, lactate threshold, and etc. For the trip I'll have a power meter and HR monitor. I plan to do road and crit races during the summer, with most of the races being predominantly road with an 1hr+ of race time and then cyclocross in the fall.

cycling
06. Februar, 12:49 Uhr

https://tourdepalmsprings.com

cycling
26. Dezember, 20:27 Uhr

Next November I'll be visiting NZ as part of 4 months travelling. I've got family in Christchurch whom I'll be visiting and staying with. I have found a company called Natural High, who offer bike rental, and specifically an 18 day self tour of the south island. Does anyone have any experience with this company or recommend similar/awesome things to do along the route? http://www.naturalhigh.co.nz/cycle_tour/sgr001-20-day-self-guided-road-cycle-tour-christchurch-to-christchurch-sg8/

cycling
21. August, 21:27 Uhr

Hello all, Just looking for some input on a good bike to buy, either a hybrid or a tourer. (Will be carrying kit including tent) I am hoping to go next summer across some parts of Belgium/ France. Probably averaging 50km a day and I'm in need of a new bike. Initially I was looking at the Dawes Karakum. Any other suggestions/ opinions? Thanks

cycling
19. Juli, 04:18 Uhr

I've been with my wife for 10 years now. We met in high school, and I got her pregnant. She is and always has been a lazy cyclist and shitty with technology. I wouldn't even mind if she at least acted like she was trying. The only reason I dealt with all this was for the kids, and also because the sex is great. But one night, I got fed up. So I finally got her to agree that she needed a new bike after her chainstay rusted so bad I could kick it off. To celebrate, I took her to a bike shop, gave her my credit card and told her to get any bike she wanted. I let her shop around talking to the employees for nearly two hours before I gave up and went to eat alone at the buffalo wild wings across the street (the bar is actually pretty nice). When I came back, she ran out of the store with a big smile and was raving that she finally picked a new bike. It was a 2018 specialized sequoia - a steel touring bike. Again. For the 15th year in a row, my wife was going to ride a fucking touring bike when we've literally never gone fucking touring and now never will. She won't even leave the house for 15 miles, always has to be under 15 miles. How do I get her to buy a road bike instead? Or even get her to go touring with me?

cycling
10. März, 05:20 Uhr

Currently being live-streamed (with Phil Liggett commentary) here: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfC9T7EmDm0](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfC9T7EmDm0) 45000 participants are taking part this year, in a staggered start in groups of a couple of hundred at a time. ​ This is a cycle tour with more than 4-decades of heritage, around the peninsula of Cape Town, South Africa. It's extremely scenic, enormously beautiful, and currently very windy, making for an interesting race (I did it a bunch of times when I still lived in Cape Town -- it's a brilliant ride, and highly recommended for anyone interested in racing next year). ​ More details about the ride itself, available here: [https://www.capetowncycletour.com/](https://www.capetowncycletour.com/)

cycling
27. Juli, 12:49 Uhr

which is second more important?

cycling
21. August, 10:37 Uhr

Cycling Tours: Cycling Tours where we offered Cycling tours and Road cycling occasions in New Zealand, Australia, USA and Europe nations Hotel Booking benefit. "Our main objective is to guard everybody. We give data about appropriate security tenets and laws to the majority of our cyclists. They should wear head protectors and we unequivocally recommend lights and mirrors to enhance perceivability and mindfulness," We go for our New Zealand cycling tours to convey astounding perspectives, fantastic phenomenal cycling and exercises, quality convenience and incredible nearby food. "Cycling tours, Cycling tours New Zealand, Cycling tours Australia, Cycling tours USA, Cycling tours Europe" Pacific Cycle Tour 14 Kennaway Rd, Woolston, Christchurch 8023, New Zealand http://www.cyclingtours.co.nz/

cycling
30. August, 09:59 Uhr

We go for our New Zealand cycling tours to convey astounding perspectives, fantastic phenomenal cycling and exercises, quality convenience and incredible nearby food. "Cycling tours, Cycling tours New Zealand, Cycling tours Australia, Cycling tours USA, Cycling tours Europe" http://www.cyclingtours.co.nz/

cycling
11. Juni, 00:39 Uhr

I have a Trek FX 3, which, after spending 15\+ years riding a rusted Giant Nutra Cross, I must say is a perfectly fine bike. (Somehow, the Nutra once got me through a 500 mile tour! No major problems during years of commuting, either, except for getting flat tires more often than the norm. So I have learned not to mock entry\-level bikes as long as they are not pure junk like Walmart bikes and other BSOs.) When I dream about upgrading, though, I tell myself I need disc brakes because I tow things\-\-and mechanical disk brakes because I have neither the equipment nor the desire to learn how to mess with hydraulics. Also, I regret buying a bike with a carbon fork and handlebars. Sure, it's a few pounds lighter. But the bike shop folks also told me that the carbon fork would be great for moderate shock absorption, and I am *not* finding that to be the case. (I could do a whole other post on my experiments in that area, but I'll stay focused.) I spend very little time feeling happy about the pounds I saved and lots of time worrying if I'll damage these "precious" components. So I dream of sturdier bikes, perhaps steel, with mechanical disc brakes. There are some great ones out there, like the Surly Disc Trucker. But then there's the Jamis Coda Comp. It meets my frame requirements, it has mechanical disc brakes, and it does not appear to have Shimano Tourney components or other tell\-tale signs of pure junk. At least none that I can detect. If a Nutra Cross got me as far as it did, maybe the Coda Comp is a "David" to the Disc Trucker's Goliath? The Coda Comp is roughly in the same price range as the FX 3, whereas the Disc Trucker and most other steel touring bikes I look at cost roughly twice as much. Very little on this subreddit has been written about the Coda Comp, though. (I found three posts, and two were from the same Coda Comp owner.) That's probably not a good thing. And I am still far from an expert at figuring out what's pure junk. Disc Trucker owners, on the other hand, support each other and offer maintenance and upgrade tips. That's worth something. So I welcome your thoughts as well as your appropriately\-tuned mockery. Is the Coda Comp vs. more expensive bikes more like David and Goliath, or more like comparing apples and oranges?

cycling
26. Mai, 14:39 Uhr

I’m am getting a bike for an upcoming tour this summer (Paris -> France, Northern Italy, Slovenia, Hungary -> Budapest). And after some thinking and research narrowed down my choice to the likes of a Ridgeback (world voyage vs tour) or a Dawes galaxy. currently, I’m leaning towards getting one of the ridgebacks, but this is due to 1) availability of getting a secondhand Dawes and 2) the uncertainty about getting something slightly more vintage for a tour (someone please settle that uncertainty and tell me there’s nothing to worry and getting a vintage bike for a tour is a great idea) A fairly big impact was budget and from what I understand the frame used with these (Reynolds 520/531) is a pretty cracking frame. Due to budget I decided to go for a slightly better second hand bike rather than a new one but with a worser frame. That said, what I’d like some thoughts about is whether this is sound enough thinking? What are peoples experience with these bikes and would anyone recommend severely going in one direction or the other?

cycling
18. Juli, 17:56 Uhr

I totaled my rear derailleur and hanger which was a Shimano Altus. It was on a Giant Escape 2 which I specifically chose over the lower model because of upgraded components. I take it to LBS and when I go pick it up I saw it was replaced with a Tourney. I told him I thought it would be Altus, or the same part that was on there when he quoted me the price. He originally said the Tourney fits but if I really want Altus it would be $10 more and about 5 days wait because they have to order it. I said that is fine I will pay and wait. Then he changed and said he will give me the Altus at no extra charge I just have to wait for shipping time. ​ Was I wrong for this or came off as bike snob, which I'm not? Did the difference between Altus vs Tourney really matter? I just know I paid extra when I bought my bike because I was under the impression I was getting better parts, so why would I downgrade now during a repair. ​ edit: did he try to get one over on me which the cheaper part? He wanted to charge more for the altus then when I agreed, he said he would do it for same cost.

cycling
06. Juli, 08:15 Uhr

I recently tore my acl in a cycling accident. I've been a massive fan of cycling and the Tour de France since birth, so since I can't go on rides this year, I've decided to create a youtube channel following the tour. I'm gonna be honest, my first video is kind of rough, but I'd love any support from fellow cyclists and cycling fans. This is my first video, kind of a preview/intro into this year's tour: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0VcgYdIQ3E](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0VcgYdIQ3E)

cycling
31. August, 04:09 Uhr

Next month, I'll be touring on my road bike for about a week and have been eyeing a pair of clipless pedals/shoes. I've never ridden clipless, but plan to get them and use them for regular day rides anyway. What I'm wondering is if it would be worth it to get them set up on the bike before touring? I'm not concerned with speed much, as I'm really taking the trip for the sights along the way. Guess I'm just wondering if they're going to make things more efficient for me? OR will it be more trouble than it's worth to get comfortable with them prior to touring? Would love to hear some thoughts.