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cycling

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16.09.2015
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cycling
09. August, 12:29 Uhr

Hello fellow cyclists, I'm looking to try SPD-SLs and am thinking of buying the Shimano R540 or the R550. The difference is in width of the pedals so I was wondering if it mattered? And is it worth to fork out some more for the ultegra pedals since my bike is running full ultegra anyways? Anyone got experience with these? In fact, any input would be much appreciated. Thanks for your time and happy riding :)

cycling
05. Mai, 13:58 Uhr

I have a Schwinn Prelude 700c road bike. I bought it on Amazon and did the very little bit of assembly required. I've had the bike for 5 or 6 years now and have thus far done all of my maintenance myself (replacing popped tubes, adjusting derailleurs, greasing chain). I'd really like to be able to learn more in depth mechanics and I'm not sure what's the best place to do that. Old school books? Websites? YouTube videos? Anything you guys can throw at me would be great. Thanks!

cycling
28. April, 11:56 Uhr

Hi All - total cycling amateur here, hoping this is the proper community to ask for some help! My friends convinced me to take part in the 5 Boro tour next Sunday, which I’m excited and nervous for. I don’t bike, though I do run so I am at least in decent shape and cardio. Does anyone have any advice for me to have a decent experience next week and not want to just ride off the bridge to end the misery? I bought padded tights. Will pick up a little kit in case of a flat (recommendations? all my local shops are very expensive). How high should I set my seat? Waters and snacks seems logical. I am doing research online but any thoughts would be really appreciated, thanks all!

cycling
06. September, 12:15 Uhr

I recently bought an old (1999) bike with Tektro mini V-brakes. The seller put fresh pads on before she sold it to me. The bike (Marinoni) rides like a dream but I can't get used to how grabby the brakes are. Even a moderate amount of pressure stops me on a dime and skids the bike or lifts the rear wheel. I'm planning on giving this bike to my daughter and she's not an experienced cyclist. Every other bike she's owned has been a city bike or beach cruiser with mediocre brakes. I'm afraid she's going to put too much pressure on the front brake and go over the bars. Is there any adjustment I can make to make the brake pressure more gradual?

cycling
29. April, 14:30 Uhr

1. When in doubt, choose uphill, cuz if you are wrong, you get to go downhill. If you choose the easy path and are wrong, you have to go back uphill. 2. Don't go so fast to your destination that you can't enjoy the scenery. 3. You are going to wipe out. And it is going to hurt a lot. No use in being scared of falling. If you don't want to fall, don't ride. 4. You can plan and plan and plan a ride and train and train but at some point you just have to hop on the bike and go. Edit: Ok guys you got me. I amend #3 to: While you can minimize the risk of falling, the only way to totally avoid it is not to ride. Don't let fear of getting hurt rob you of the fun of cycling. Nothing worth doing comes without any chance of getting hurt.

cycling
14. September, 17:42 Uhr

I ride suburban roads, where there is car traffic on single and double-yellow line roads, and no sidewalks. My wife is a walker/jogger and I'm a biker. We have a disagreement, so I thought I'd ask this highly impartial group for your opinion. Lately, I've found a lot of joggers running against traffic. They are in the road (no sidewalks) and as I approach, they hold their line, which forces me into the lane. Even with oncoming cars behind me and behind them (they can't see/hear the cars behind them, because they are usually listening to music and of course don't sport a mirror). My wife says tough nuts, and it's my job to get out of their way. My point of view is that, as a jogger, they can easily run on the grass (these roads are suburban, so there's lots of manicured grass around) in a way that I cannot. They can also stop far shorter than I can and get out of the way. What say you? Edit - great replies and thanks all. I owe my wife some points on this one clearly.

cycling
15. November, 02:38 Uhr

Before the details, my celebratory stuff. [Strava pic](https://imgur.com/DSGMflR). Thanks everyone for helping me out with my questions earlier this year about nutrition for riding a double (imperial) century. TL;DR: I can hack through 185kms in late Spring/early Autumn easy without preparation, but prep is important for 336kms. Also, keep drinking fluids. That's important. And don't do a whole bunch of anaerobic climbing out the saddle in the same week. **During the ride** I had problems with numb toes and cold feet in the past 3 weeks and the nerve under the ball of my left foot hurt. I put baking paper around my feet to stop the wind, and I got some vent foam from the hardware store for the ball of my left foot. Both those solutions worked really well, and my feet didn't clam up from sweat with the baking paper. The first hour out of the city was terrible. Wind, cold, and numb toes. I keep shifting around on the saddle and find that some positions alleviate my numbness. About 4 hours into the ride, I figure out the numb toes is because of saddle height. I changed it over a month ago because I thought my knee pain was from a saddle too low (turns out my IT band needed stretching). I forgot about it and didn't ride any long distances for about 2 months due to illness and typhoons. I lowered my saddle by 5mm 4 hours in and the numb toes went away. Problem solved. Somewhere at the 70k mark, I had about 10 close calls with trucks and cars on a very busy road. People pulling out of driveways, seeing me, and deciding to pull out anyway. Trucks passing within arms reach etc. Literally the worst drivers I've encountered all year in a single day and I've been on that road a couple of times before. The wind and cold start to get to me at the 120km mark. It had been fairly relentless since the start on the first bridge crossing and the entire length of the first small island, it killed me. I've ridden comfortably at -2C with nothing but my base layer and my softshell, but this was a special kind of cold. The temp was reported at 13C which is fairly mild. I end up wearing my base layer, long sleeve jersey, softshell and my windbreaker. I'm also wearing windbreaker pants over my shorts and leg warmers. I've ridden 180kms no problem before, I've also ridden -2C no problems before so I'm not sure what's going on here. By the 5th bridge crossing, I realise my chain is squeaking. I wonder how much energy it's been sucking away. Get to the bike store I know of about 2 hours later and buy a small bottle of lube. Problem solved. Sometime maybe at the 230km mark in the rural mountains, I see a road sign say it's 5C. I'm ok on the bike, but I freeze if I stop for any amount of time. I suspect my sweat has soaked through most of my layers. Legs are starting to get fatigued and every climb has me on my small ring and one of the biggest 2 cogs. 230kms isn't much more than my previous longest at 185 where I still had plenty of energy left in the tank and legs, but I didn't realise just how much climbing there would be on this ride. It was a never-ending undulating roller coaster of willpower, but at least the wind had died down. It was also the rural mountains, dark, and signs for wild boar around. I wanted to get outta there asap. At some stage during the ride, I realise I'm dehydrated. I constantly had a feeling of a full bladder near the start so by the end of the ride, I think I had only had around 5L of water for the whole day. I arrive in the outer city limits of Hiroshima and it's now a slow crawl into the city centre. Very little traffic, but I'm not gonna run a red and risk having my ride end early at this stage. At least I still have energy to mess around and play "the floor is made of lava" at some lights like I usually do. **Post ride** At the hotel and I still feel a special kind of cold to my bones. Take a hot shower and I'm still cold. I stretch my piriformis, IT band, calves, quads, hamstrings and lower back and suddenly my body is on fire. Like, insanely hot and I start sweating. I have to turn the AC on so I can sleep. Anyone know what was going on there? Next morning I wake up with an insane thirst. I have 3L of water within a couple of hours and I'm still parched and don't need to pee. I'm thirsty all day and I keep drinking. I suspect I was extremely dehydrated and just didn't know it. I'm usually pretty good with fluid in warm weather, but I misjudged everything the day before. 2 days after the ride, I feel like I have a hangover and my body is getting rid of some kind of toxic sludge that I feel if I drink too much. Urine is cloudy and I'm still constantly thirsty. Anyone know what was going on with my body? The coldness I felt during the ride persisted a couple of days after, too. It's now 3 days after and I feel back to normal. Was it because I didn't hydrate enough, or my body just got fatigued and decided to turn the central heating off? Last, all the fuelling advice from people here came in handy. I brought so much food in the form of sweet bean paste blocks and cream cheese cranberry maple rice cakes I made. Ate most of the food but didn't need a single gel. Definitely didn't hydrate enough (to dangerous levels), and I needed to wear every damn layer I had. Also, those caffeine electrolyte tablets were helpful for the last 100kms. One bottle with salts, one with plain water. Thanks everyone. All your advice has been helpful and will continue to be!

cycling
29. November, 22:04 Uhr

Who uses them? I'm starting to do longer solo rides and just wondering what are the rules and etiquette?

cycling
10. August, 00:45 Uhr

I currently work under deliveroo and if you have heard anything about it, they dont care really for their workers, so if i want any sort of insurance i need to get it myself. Ive had a look and most insurance companies who do cycling insurance is based up bikes being stolen etc. For me the insurance id mainly be needing is incase i get hit by a car or something while im working. Can anyone give any suggestions on a company who would insure me as some companies dont include when accidents happen when working etc. Edit - best to note im from England

cycling
02. Februar, 11:47 Uhr

As the title says, I started getting severe knee pain after a bike fit each time after about 20 minutes of riding. I know that the problem lies in the seat being pushed forward as much as possible, because when I got it all the way back, the pain was gone immediately, but the handlebars are a bit too far to be comfortable right now. So my question is, are there any ways I can fix this issue without getting a smaller bike? I'm thinking shorter stem (I have a 10cm one now, would a 6-7 make a noticeable difference?), maybe shorter (or longer?) cranks, could my flexibility be an issue? Thank you for your answers!

cycling
08. August, 15:51 Uhr

Would any lube work? I was thinking of just getting bike lube from WalMart More info about me: I live in Southern California, so it rarely rains. I am in a deserty part, so lots of dirt even on roads. I only ride paved roads, no offroading. I have a hybrid bike, Giant Escape 3. I do basic maintenance. Anything else I would take it to a shop. I am not a huge clean freak.

cycling
01. April, 14:30 Uhr

http://deadspin.com/endurance-cycling-legend-mike-hall-killed-by-car-driver-1793898930

cycling
25. August, 02:22 Uhr

Discussion among enthusiasts tends to become a bunch of gear queer talk where you hear things like "you really want Shimano 105 as a minimum". When I first got into cycling I did my first 800 miles on the road on a second hand low-end mountain bike with Tourney parts that weighed over 35lb, had 2 inch knobby tires, and a fork that doesn't lock out. And it was fine. I did rides over 50 miles on it. My point is get out there and ride the shit out of what you have. If you're looking to get into cycling and your budget is low, don't sweat it. There's no reason you can't have just as much fun on a cheap bike.

cycling
18. September, 01:58 Uhr

I joined you centenarians yesterday. For those who don't care about the details, tldr- charity ride event with 9 rest stops, 5000 feet of climbing. I struggled for the last 30 miles and half of the climbing but finished it out as the last person to cross the finish line. I had done some pretty good hill climbs and an 80 miler in preparation, but never one hundred. It was a charity event and they had plenty of support for the riders. I got off to a good start but the first climb of 2000 feet from mile 20-25 took more out of me than expected. By the time I hit the turnaround point I felt about like I did before serious cramping 5 miles from the end of my 80 miler with a serious climb still ahead of me. At that point I was pretty worried I wouldn't make it. The volunteers were updating rider positions and I was near the tail end. By the time I hit the 64 mile checkpoint the two riders behind me had dropped out. That really hits close to home when you are closer to the riders dropping out than the finish. At this point I was climbing gradually until the mountain pass and stretching the nearly cramped muscles every 5 miles. I ended up getting a second wind for the first big push of 2 miles at 6% grade. At this point I was really feeling exhausted but one more mile and a short 8% grade push and I would be at the top. I have done some tough things physically and felt like I was at 110% already. The last climb pushed me so much further but I did it. It felt so sweet reaching the summit knowing it was all down hill from there. The rest of the ride back was me taking it as quick as I could, but still slow considering I had been 90 miles already. A few more stops to stretch and leapfrogs with the support crew and I wrapped up the century riders by cruising in 8.5 hours after starting out. I now have so much more respect for anyone doing a century. After my 65 milers and an 80, the hundred didn't seem like such a huge accomplishment. Boy was I wrong. My moving average speed was 13.6 mph, slower than the 15 mph I thought it would be but I'm just glad I finished. Kudos to all you centenarians out there, I respect you.

cycling
01. März, 19:27 Uhr

[The Windsor Star is reporting](http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/bike-lanes-to-be-included-on-gordie-howe-international-bridge) that the new Gordie Howe International Bridge will include bike lanes.

cycling
03. Oktober, 16:04 Uhr

What must you have when you go road cycling? Curious what people take with them when cycling. I'm use to riding around a closed loop around a lake so I never prepare a pack or anything but recently decided to start riding to and from the lake but not sure what all I should be taking with me. EDIT: I have some shopping to do

cycling
02. März, 01:15 Uhr

REMEMBER: I'M NOT A LAWYER 2.5 years ago a driver turned in front of me causing me to slam my brakes and I flew over the handlebars. As a result of the fall I seriously injured my hand, needed surgery, and now have only 75% functionality. [Here's](https://thefranster.exposure.co/the-little-things) a look at the life of the injury. I reluctantly got a Personal Injury lawyer because I wanted to get my medical bills covered. Now after more than 2 years I finally went to court and won the maximum policy coverage for my injuries. Sometimes being a safe cyclist isn't enough to keep you from unsafe drivers. So! If you're in an accident let me give you some advice that helped me win my case: 1. Be wearing a helmet 2. Make sure your bike is compliant (lights, bell, whatever's required in your area) 3. If you're able, immediately after the incident look around and gather witnesses to collect their info. Ask them to write down what they saw both for you and for their memory (this takes years!) 4. Get photos immediately and don't move anything (your bike, their car, etc.) 5. CALL 911/The police! You need a police report - describe the issue as accurately as you can remember it 6. Go to the hospital - get checked out 7. Don't get in to any controversial exchanges with the driver, but if they say something to you try to remember what it is

cycling
26. September, 15:31 Uhr

First, thank for all the replies the first post received. Okay, so I took my bike to a frame guy. He looked it over, and he agreed, that the scuff was a little deeper than a superficial mark. He believes that someone had to have drop their bike on it, or it was roughed up in the storage closet I keep it in at work. Like others stated, that scuff may look minor, but the impact that caused it may not have been. He showed me the blemish, and how it would not simply just come off, something I never noticed before. I'm a little embarrassed I went to such lengths, but I was also annoyed that I couldn't get specialized to look at the bike directly without a fight. Long story short: they are giving me a pretty good replacement deal, and I am never commuting on my carbon bikes (as much as I enjoy it) again. I just can't feasibly keep my eye on it at all times I kept the bike in a janitorial closet at all times, and I am thinking that someone must have dropped something onto it. Edit: Trashed a $2000 carbon frame, but, I got some gold out of it.

cycling
30. September, 21:48 Uhr

https://imgur.com/gallery/6wbEL

cycling
10. März, 23:11 Uhr

I ride anywhere from 3 to 8 hours everyday and I'm looking to buy a new frame I currently ride a steel frame that has been perfectly fine for my regimen but is rather heavy. When researching I find that aluminium has a reputation for being much less resilient than cromoly but I can't find out for certain whether or not this is a significant enough issue for me to eliminate aluminium from my possible materials. Edit: All your comments were very informative and helpful usually I would thank you individually but writing thanks 14 times seems like it would cheapen the sentiment but I appreciate the help with my question.

cycling
20. Februar, 21:57 Uhr

On my way home tonight I was riding down the main road and passing the entrance to a T junction. A car driver coming onto the road at that junction did not look properly and he hit me immediately as I passed in front of him. He was stationary before driving a couple of meters prior to striking me, so thankfully hadn't enough time to get some decent speed. Still, I went flying, but somehow I've escaped with only a bruise and a few scrapes. The bike is in a similar state and after calming down I was able to cycle home. Before getting back on tomorrow morning I'll give it a proper check for cracks to the frame. I've no idea if extra lights on my torso would have helped but I've since bought an LED-fitted vest and some light-up armbands too. I always cycle with a bright front light on my frame and a reflective jacket, but a few more lights won't hurt. Make sure you're visible, and please stay safe out there.

cycling
20. September, 01:20 Uhr

I made a post last week about my Tarmac failing during a ride. As I have maintained, I have never raced, crashed, laid down, or abused this bike. When I transport it, its in my hatchback. I believe on one occasion, something put a scuff on the seat stay, next to where the frame ultimately failed. [There is a white scuff. Above the crack. Is this really a scuff big enough to deny a claim on a $2000 frame?](https://imgur.com/gallery/rNQly) [I have video of the moment the bike failed and my story behind it](https://youtu.be/w0anc-N-_5E) If you think that Specialized, who is known for their warranty, is justified in denying this claim. Please, let me know. Otherwise, I am the first owner of this bike, it was brand new when I bought it directly from Specialized, and I don't think this is a fair decision. Could you please tweet at Spesh for me, with the links and the video. This bike was super important to me, and I cannot afford to buy another one. I treated it like a baby, and it breaks my heart knowning they are giving me a hard time. EDIT: It also bothers me that the rep won't even go look at the bike. The thing does not look like it has seen any abuse. Edit 2: They want the bike sent to them. Not sure if I should be pushing them to take the frame only, because I don't see why they need my aftermaeket wheels.

cycling
17. Juli, 23:19 Uhr

Looking to hear what experiences people have had buying from Canyon in the USA. I am seriously considering an Aeroad for my next bike. Has anyone visited their Showroom in CA?

cycling
09. Oktober, 04:36 Uhr

This summer I did some experiments to optimize my cycle-touring range. Now I just completed the 4 river bike-route in Korea, leading >600km from Seoul to Busan, diagonally across the country. Despite heavy rain on the last third of the tour, the whole ride only took me only 56 hours and I rode alone without external support. Here are some key aspects how I achieved this ride (and a couple other fast ones). To put it into perspective: Being a mountaineer, cycling is not my main sport but I do cover quite some distance in my everyday life and have a decent stamina. **Key Aspects:** - Try to stop as rarely as possible. I ate, drank, took pictures and took on/off my raincoat while riding. Avoid navigation stops too. Stopping costs time and even worse: breaks the rythm. - Don't go too fast or you'll have sore legs, avoid high intensity - Don't bring panniers (aerodynamics, weight) or a backpack (at least my back hurts after a couple hours). Stick to saddle bags and limit lugguage big time - Continuously eat lot's of carbs. If you feel hungry it's already too late. - Camping is not an option (too much luggage and too much time). **The Bike** For the long and fast tours, I ride a road-bike with comfortable seat position (Canyon Endurace). I have a Saddle bag and a small bag on the handle-bar with my valueables. **The Luggage** Bike jersey, pants and gloves, compact rain coat; SPD-Shoes; T-Shirt, very light shorts and a set of underwear for the evenings-, mobile phone, power bank; wallet, oversleeves for legs and arms, tooth brush and paste, repare set, spare tube, pump, lock, sunscreen, 2x600ml liquid, some snacks. Things I passed on: Rain pants, Non-SPD-shoes, shower-equipment and so on... **The Speed & Time-Management** In the flat without wind, I try to ride around 26km/h (16mph). It is important, that the speed "feels boring" as you need to keep it up for a long time and multiple days. During the whole day, I try to make 20km for every hour I am on the road (including breaks, minor hills, traffic lights and so on - only exception: when riding mountains with >200m elevation gain). I usually didn't start terribly early (around 8am) and kept riding until it got dark. Often I feel very good in the evenings and ride until 9pm. Good lights required for this. Lots of sleep is also a key aspect to stay fit for me. 10 hours are optimal for me on these tours. **Psychological Approach** I never display anything other than my speed on the bike-computer. Looking at the daily distance makes me count kilometers - nothing worse than that. I try to focus on the landscape, other riders or whatever. Just enjoy myself as much as possible. Trying to get the most kilometers out of a day, it is important to have several options as where to go to in the evening. Having the budget to stay in most hotels certainly helps here. **Sore legs** For multi-day trips it is important to consider the fact that you need to ride on the next day as well. For me it is very important to know my limits not to have a break-down after an overly motivated first day. For me speed and steep hills seem to be the killer. Therefore I try to avoid high intensity at any cost, even if it means to push my bike up steep hills every now and then. I did a couple one-day trips from home to get a feeling for my limits. **Food** During the day I only eat food that I can consume on the bicycle (sometimes I get proper lunch though). Mostly power bars and other high-carb foods (e.g. Gimbap here in Korea). Bananas also work very well. In the evenings I paid a lot of attention to eating lots of carbs and also plenty proteins. Generally I have to force myself to eat, eating when hungry is a bad idea at least for me. Additionally I have coke or energy drinks in one of my bottles and water in the other one. ---------------------------------------------------------------- The stats of this particular tour for anyone interested: Day 1: 265km, 1700m elevation gain, averaged 24km/h (Mostly flat with some serious mountains at the end, perfect weather and fresh legs) Day 2: 198km, 900m elevation gain, averaged 23km/h (Mostly flat with some short nasty steep hills and some dirt/gravel sections that slowed me down. Stopped by rain in the evening, legs felt so-so) Day 2: 146km, 800m elevation gain, averaged 24km/h (again some short nasty steep hills and continuous rain until 2 hours before the finish, finished the ride at 3pm, legs felt very good)

cycling
01. August, 14:16 Uhr

A few reflections / lessons learned since buying my first bike 6 weeks ago: I've been steadily building in weekly mileage; training for a 20 mile round trip commute. Up to about 70 miles / week. * I've lost 10lbs. 🎉 * Lights are non-negotiable. Drivers are distracted at ALL times of day.  Repair kit, also non-negotiable. * Incentives are key to starting and maintaining this habit.  I have learned that I'm addicted to stats and Strava heatmaps.  * Shout out to GCN's Youtube vid on how to change a flat! (Shout out that entire channel) * In my previous pedestrian life, I regret ever walking in the *dedicated* bike trail and apologize to every cyclist who had to encounter me.   * To the assholes biking double-wide in *both* opposing lanes of a narrow and often curving urban trail: F\*@#. You. Seriously, this is how people break their necks.  Don’t do this. * How cool is cycling!? The culture, the equipment, the effort, exercise. It's been incredible to experience my city from the cyclist’s perspective. I love it. 

cycling
25. September, 20:04 Uhr

I graduated university in May and was looking for a new hobby to pick up to fill in time, and stay fit, so I started talking to my friends who ride and did a lot of creeping around Reddit. The first thing I learned was that there was no "cheap" entry bike. I went around to my LBS to scout some road bikes and ended up landing on Giant's contend 3 as the one I'd get when I decided to pull the trigger. I have a rule about "big" purchases (anything $300+) and waiting two months to see if I still want it as bad after doing research and testing out whatever product it might be. Well, it's been two months and I haven't stopped reading up on bikes, scouting out deals, riding with friends, or googling images on bikes in my price range at night lol. I pulled the trigger at a LBS in Smyrna, Ga and walked away with the Giant contend 3 2017 model and a helmet right in the sweet spot of my price range. Took it home and hit the road! I did a 10mile loop and ended up back home wanting more so I set back out on a quick 5mile loop. I haven't had this much fun riding a bike since I was a kid! I read a lot of information and stories here so I thought I'd post as a kind of thank you for helping me get out on the road. TL;DR Bought my first road bike today (Giant Contend 3 2017), road 10miles but wanted more, so I set back out for a bit more time on the road. Can't believe how much fun I had.

cycling
27. Januar, 14:05 Uhr

Yesterday I was riding through some local back roads when I passed a UPS who was pulling out of someones driveway. The road was littered with gravel, tight, downhill, and had a stop sign maybe 100 yards ahead. I was going 20mph in a 25mph zone according to Strava and approaching the stop sign when I hear the massive truck trying to PASS me. I tried to yell and tell him there was a stop sign and to wait but of course we ended up at the stop sign at the same time. There was maybe a foot of room between me and truck. I yelled a lot of mean and hateful things, and for that, I am half sorry. The only evidence I have is my Strava record of the ride and the 2 houses the truck stopped at. The house before the offense and after. Is this enough to identify the driver or even give them enough to care? This driver should NOT be on the road. It's hard to describe how scary and dangerous this maneuver was and I feel the need to report it. It happened yesterday and I'm still all bent out of shape about it.

cycling
02. Oktober, 16:52 Uhr

So I'm doing my first bike race next weekend and in preparation I wanted to get new pedals and shoes. I used to have some old stock steel mountain bike pedals that came with it and an older pair of athletic shoes. They worked, but I have to look professional at a real bike event (obviously!). I get the pedals over the weekend and then today I went and bought the shoes. Of course, I have to get right out there to try them out to make sure they work. In the back of my head, I hear the echoes of those who came before me: *Unclip before you have to stop.* *Don't put too much weight on one side.* I get outside near my front porch, which has a sidewalk that leads around to my driveway. I get my left foot clipped in, get the momentum to carry me out to the driveway, start trying to get my right foot clipped in and then, "oh crap, forgot to close the garage door!" So I drift into my driveway thinking, "I got this!" While nearly coming to a stop at a slow speed, I put too much weight onto my left side because that was the foot still clipped in and down I went! I hopped right back up feeling like an idiot hoping nobody saw me. I don't think any of my neighbors were outside. Scuffed up my knee and a little bit on my elbow. And, scuffed up the bike a little bit. Glad to join you all!

cycling
04. September, 17:53 Uhr

Hey fellow cyclists. Friday morning I was struck by a van on my way to work. It was 100% the vans fault as well. I ended up being taken to the ER with a severe wrist fracture, went unconscious twice, and pretty bruised and scraped up elsewhere. Will need surgery. Has anyone else had this experience, and if so, what should I expect? Will her insurance cover my injuries? How long does recovery from surgery like this last? Anyone with similar stories please share. Thanks!

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