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cycling

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16.09.2015
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cycling
22. Januar, 14:50 Uhr

About halfway into a long, unsupported training ride, I’ll stop, to refuel and rest. Yesterday’s was down in Redfield, a small town situated in the rural Arkansas delta. It’s not unusual during one of these rest stops that a local will walk up and ask, something to the effect of ‘how far you riding today?’ I’ve learned it’s easier, i.e. requiring the least amount of explanation, to offer a ‘you don’t want to know’ kind of response, with a polite smile. On this occasion, because I was in no particular hurry, and she seemed like such a nice lady, I told the truth, that I’d started my ride hours before, in Maumelle, some 50 miles to the Northwest. Because she was nice, I was spared the ‘well you must be crazy’ line. Rather, she was interested in my route, expressed concern about the neighborhoods I had to pass through, some of the poorest in Little Rock, and are considered ‘unsafe’ by many. I could tell by the look on her face that my reply was unexpected. That I consider the so-called poor neighborhoods, or ghettos safer passage than the affluent ones. That the lower-than-middle classes seem happy to share the road, as opposed to the upper-middle-classes that are in too much of a hurry to slow down, a little bit, to pass safely. We speculated with each other why this must be. For my part I think it a combination of function over form (obsessed with being on time vs. being composed), and a ‘they don’t belong on the road’ type of attitude. We parted ways soon afterwards, not before wishing each other safe travels, in whatever neighborhoods, and mode of transport we find ourselves.

cycling
10. März, 15:32 Uhr

Hello! I had an interesting situation on yesterday's ride. I was crossing through an intersection on a green light and another cycling was coming from my right on the cross street of the intersection I was crossing through. He ended up running his red light making a turn in front of me into the bike lane and forcing me to crash into the curb. My question is this - obviously he's a cock, but how do I go about get this resolved with fixing the damages to my bike (broken rim, cracked head tube, scratches and cosmetic defects) Thanks!

cycling
16. Juni, 22:51 Uhr

I (30/f) can't seem to get faster on my bike. I feel like I'm in really good shape. I workout 3-4 times a week at the gym and ride about 3 days a week. I do ride with a youth mentoring team so I should say my average is about 11-13 mph. Sometimes I get lucky and ride with the kids who average 14-17mph and they kick my butt. We are both on the same type of Trek hybrid and I'm just gassed at the end of our rides. I feel like for as good of shape as I'm in I shouldn't be struggling so much on my bike. I attend a crossfit gym and I feel like it's more strength focused. Should i up my cardio? Nutrition is fine. Edit: I will add that our rides on Monday and Thursday evenings are 30-42 miles each and Saturdays are 50-70 miles. Elevation is anywhere from 400ft to closer to 2000.

cycling
14. Januar, 13:22 Uhr

I do have asthma which might be contributing to the issue. Edit 1: I am talking about cycling not running .

cycling
20. Februar, 00:28 Uhr

Just bought a fixed gear/single speed reversible hub off craigslist this morning. Got a great deal for a solid ride. But that's not the point of this story. Anyway, I got home, immediately adjusted the seat and flipped the hub to fixed. I don't have a ton of experience riding fixed, but I figured I could handle it. Long story short, wearing a helmet saved my life. Tried to beat a yellow light, a some car sped up to do the same to turn left, traveling opposite direction of me. Couldn't stop, turned the handle bars 90° and flipped. Skidded like 8' on the side of my head, bleeding hard from my right shoulder, both hands and both knees. Cracked helmet. Sitting at the closest bar now, feeling like a fucking idiot. Promptly switching it back to single speed when I get home. Stay safe out there!

cycling
09. April, 20:31 Uhr

Sometimes on long rides when I'm on a quiet road, I grab my hoods with my thumb, index, and middle finger wrapped around the top of the brakes. Then I put my ass over the back of the saddle and go aero. Then I rock my bicycle forward and back, and go "ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba". Especially when drivers get too close I do it to them, that'll show em to drive too close!! I can't be the only one?!

cycling
26. März, 01:08 Uhr

EDIT: Please read the addendum. I don't want to alarm anyone. Over the past couple years, I've been drawn further & further into the incredible world of cycling, & now that I have a lot more experience under my belt, having been a wrench, a salesperson, a volunteer mechanic & staffer at a local bike co-op, & a tourer, I feel I can give some words of advice back to those who are just starting fresh. EDIT: here is the trigger phrase. Read the addendum. Cycling is expensive. You've picked one of the most expensive hobbies in existence. The sheer amount of new gadgets, components, frames, standards, kits, trends, & fads, just doesn't end. While I suppose it's a sign of a healthy industry, it also lends itself horribly to the snobbier side of cycling. There are those who will call you out on your local rides, sneer at your less-than-perfect setup, & in general, just dictate how & what you should ride. Slam your stem, your bike's too big/small for you, tilt your hoods down, tilt your bars down, tilt your saddle up, big ring it, driveside first for the camera - it's ridiculous at times. They're here in this community, they're out there on group rides, & they're behind the counters at a lot of shops too. Yet there isn't anything much more personal than *your* bike, despite the waves of conformity ushering everyone to overspend & overequip themselves to fit some unrealistic standard that updates nightly. I'll admit: during my first forays into cycling, I did the same thing. It was worse when I left for a 3 month self-supported tour. I tried to cut corners on everything, true to my frugal upbringings, but the cheap stuff bit me in the ass in the middle of nowhere. After buying replacements & spending double out on the road, I came home to urge others to do the same. "It's an investment, not a replacement." At times, I was right; though I was wrong quite a few times too - vouching for things beyond the customer's use. During my time as a mechanic in a college town, I've learned to be humble. Generally the first questions/remarks I got from customers were about the price. "Hi, I'm looking for a bike under $120." "That pump ($50 in store) goes for $30 on Amazon." *quiets voice* "Do you think I could get that cheaper elsewhere?" & it makes sense to a certain degree. Students, the economically disadvantaged, & beginners often balk at the prices because they really are about 2-3 times higher than what we employees get at cost. But like a $2 glass of milk at a restaurant, the $380 price tag for our cheapest bike, spread over 8 wrenches, doesn't count for much after trying to keep the lights on, to buy supplies, etc. A $15 flat change seemed ridiculous until you considered that we could likely do it much faster & more assuredly than you could (had a guy try to prove it wasn't worth $15, & proceeded to blow out his tube during installation). It was worse at the co-op where I volunteered, where prices were much closer to at cost, for the general public. People would steal, skimp on much needed parts, & try to haggle prices (we had an open sign forbidding that). However, it was at those shops that I learned not to judge, be it a BSO or a Cervelo. Hell, we were responsible for selling most of the Schwinns out there in the first place. It just wasn't our place to assume how finances were going for our customer. I realized, between the shop & the co-op, people just wanted something to ride. For the vast majority of my customers, bikes weren't fun or recreation - it was nothing more than a means of transportation, be it to class or to a job. I had a woman cry at the co-op since she didn't know how she'd get to work the next day; we were closing up shop & her bike didn't move. During group rides, people told me to buy aerobars, slow my cadence, tuck in my shoulders & get lower, yelled at me & others for taking a pull too long, & not knowing all of their aero formations. It was more mentally draining trying not to fuck up, than actually riding. It spoiled group rides so much around here that I've just gone solo for the past 8 months or so. So that's it - the cost of cycling. You'll need to learn, beyond basic mechanic skills, to reserve your judgment, & to spend wisely. Don't always go for the cheapest option; if it breaks & warrants a replacement, then it really wasn't the cheapest. Buy the shop ('s service & friendliness), not the bike. Many people intend to ride their bike for more than one day - how does $1000 spread over 300 days out of a year? out of two years? A bike *is* an investment. Now apply that to components, accessories, gadgets, tools, etc. People need to stop seeing it as some sort of disposable instrument that they have to put up every once in a while. That's how I put it for my customers: sure, it's a $700 bike, but if you ride it everyday as a commuter, that $700 spreads awfully thin. Doesn't that beat buying a yearly bus pass - having the freedom to leave whenever you want, & the confidence to know that in a day's time, you could be more than a 100 miles from where you started by the sweat of your own brow? Because in the end, it's all about riding a bike. As a wrench, as a volunteer, & as another cyclist, I just want to see these bikes make some people happy - regardless of the depth of your rims & of the modulus of your carbon fiber. I hope this helps someone. EDIT: Okay, I didn't expect this kind of response. I don't want to earn the ire of everyone here. "Cycling is expensive. You've picked one of the most expensive hobbies in existence." This was an exaggeration/joke, & a poor one at that. I apologize. In fact, this is a perfect example of not only shitty, unedited writing, but also of the very "walk a mile in someone's shoes" situation that I was describing - that differences in perspective, & how prejudice can make you think a person can afford beyond their ability. I apologize since it wasn't clear, but here's some context. I'm a university student. I'm as stereotypically poor as you might think. The co-op at which I volunteer is mainly aimed towards those of low-income families & students looking for a way to get to class & to work. So for me, & the people I know best around here, cycling is one of the more expensive hobbies. A number of you pointed out this mistake, & rightly so. Yes, astrophotography, firearms, & boat collecting are just a few of the infinitely more expensive hobbies out there. However, as I replied to someone else below, many of these examples are already evidently expensive. Cycling, I think, seems cheap at first because, how complicated can a two wheel pipe wagon get? So although it might attract a lot of initial interest, the rampant elitism I see quickly stifles prospective beginners. I also acknowledge how long & poorly written this was. I'm not going to edit it because that's how I first said it, so I'm sticking with honesty here. Hopefully this addendum will lay some of your worries to rest. So I wrote the following TL;DR. TL;DR Elitism is bad, & present in cycling. Don't do it because it discourages beginners. Others remarked that I should just find another group. Unfortunately, there are only two clubs in my area. I will try the other one at some point given what's happened with the first. I don't want to discount the possibility, for myself, or for others, of just riding by yourself. That's fine. In fact, if you think you might be a danger to others, please ride by yourself then. Only when you feel confident, should you start riding with a group to further build your confidence. For the record, the group as a whole wasn't terrible. Most of them were very responsible, safety-oriented folks. I learned a great deal with them - not just proper signalling in a paceline, some formations, & other techniques, but it was the few members (who showed up to most rides), that would scare off a lot of other beginners. I would see this happening to potential new recruits & decided that I didn't want to be a part of the exclusive society these few elitists were trying to make. Their safety/rules were on point. I have absolutely no complaints in that regard. They did a fantastic job. Maybe I'm in the (hopefully a) minority of people with bad first impressions. If you didn't have to deal with this, I'm glad that you escaped, & probably enjoyed a lot more wholesome experience than I did. I don't harbor any ill will towards anyone else here, & I hope neither do you towards me. No hard feelings. I'm just some dude on the internet saying stuff. Feel free to criticize; you won't hurt my feelings, & I hope I didn't elevate your morning blood pressure. It was my mistake to forget that some of things I discussed could be sensitive for others. At the very least, I'm happy that this post, even if a lot people hate it, promoted some wholesome & diverse discussion below.

cycling
11. Juli, 02:40 Uhr

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-china-tariffs/u-s-says-to-slap-tariffs-on-extra-200-billion-of-chinese-imports-idUSKBN1K0336 https://www.bicycleretailer.com/north-america/2018/07/10/new-round-tariffs-targets-200-billion-chinese-goods

cycling
17. Februar, 17:26 Uhr

I rented a bike at the end of last month while on a work trip to San Francisco. I'm from NY, and could not pass up a chance to ride in January. It was a Specialized Allez, aluminum, Sora components, and overall a pretty nice fit, and they were nice enough to throw some pedals on it for me, as I had brought my shoes. I had a pack with stuff for the day which included food, water, street clothes and a heavy Kryptonite lock they made me take. The ride was supposed to be 40 miles, with less than 1500 feet of climbing - essentially up the shoreline on bike paths, across the Golden Gate, up a decent hill from sea level, down into the Muir Woods valley, and back. The ride up to and across the bridge was straightforward, scenic as hell, not fast (lots of pedestrians) but still - no complaints! It's the Golden Gate Bridge! Little did I know that it would be a VERY long time before I'd see this bridge again. They have an extensive network of bike trails, and great bike lanes. Got a bit off track, but a local rider got me back on the right road and advised me what route to take. I have this habit of nodding my head and agreeing even though I may be a few clicks short of fully comprehending directions. His advice was spot on, until I hit a detour. Lots of rain messed up Route 1, and I had to climb quit a bit more, exiting in a different spot. Roads don't seem to have straightforward names and/or frequent signage out there, and are massively twisty. At times, it's tough to know what direction you're heading. (Let the record show that Strava paused somehow, probably when I used Google Maps, and cheated me out of about 5 miles and 700 feet of elevation at this point). No worries - I see the signs for Muir Woods, my destination. I start a fast, twisting descent with lots of cars and rough pavement. Oops! This is the road the rider guy told me to NOT take. Well, too late. I survive some close calls, one being a Prius half way in in my lane head on after rounding a blind curve. Reaching the bottom, I was in Muir Woods. Redwoods. Spectacular. Epic. Maybe a touch cold and damp for my sweat soaked gear. After checking the woods out for 1/2 hour, it was time to head back. I forgot to mention on my way down the rough road earlier, I had seen only one guy ascending on a bike. His face and body language, as he battled the inclines and cars, indicated that he was in a place worse than hell. No way was I going out the same way I went in. The bike shop guy had told me there was an easier way out, and I had it on this glossy touristy map. Out I went, leaving traffic and crappy pavement behind. It was nice to be in the sunshine, even though this was a long climb. I was alone on the Panoramic Highway. No bikes, cars, or anyone came by for a long time. Highway 1, back to Sauaslito was not far, and I knew this because my map said so. Keep in mind, as you wind your way up these hills, you can't see anything. No Golden Gate Bridge, city, bay, ocean, or other landmarks are there to help cross check. You really can't even tell how much more climbing you have to do. You just have to trust they'll end eventually, you'll see a landmark, and all will be fine. After reaching the top, it was difficult to see much, but the road became instantly epic - no cars, smooth, wide, and a coastline view with waves breaking hundreds of feet below. Wait. Crap! - why is the coast on my left? Why can't I see SF, the Golden Gate, Bay Bridge or anything? I knew the road looped, and it was so amazing, there was no chance I'd be going back. Several miles ahead, a construction worker confirmed Route 1 was ahead. He smiled, barely, and said "You've got a bit of a ride ahead of you!" A combination of thrill, from the epicness of the road, and a bit of fear crept into my emotions. I was still headed North, after all. I really needed South. Hell, even East. West was a big, huge ocean. I really felt the full 3000 miles from home. It was such an amazing road in every way. A right turn finally appeared, and a rider in a full Strava kit also appeared. I flagged him down, asking about the best way back to SF. He said "You can climb it all at once this way in about 20 minutes, or a bit more, or go back." I wasn't going back. I followed Strava guy for a while up a winding, slow killer, 6-10% grade. Then the trees appeared. Huge old growth pines and Sequoias, unspoiled, in all their splendor towered over the road, blocking the sun. Then my sweat soaked gear hit the cold, damp woods air. I was climbing up a valley in Mount Tamalpais park, specifically up Mt. Tamalpais itself. I needed some Cliff blocks. I needed a lot more more Cliff blocks. My water was low. My phone was almost dead. Turn after turn after turn, the climb would not quit. The epic trees prevent you from seeing how much longer the road winds ahead of you, not to mention the summit. A guy on a dual sport KTM passed me, and I could hear his bike making turn after turn WAY up the hill. All I could do is push pedals. Eventually, I see sunlight, and after another 10 minutes of furious peddling I, broke through the trees at the peak, completely fried. My clothes were more soaked, and while happy to be headed downhill, it was freezing. My hands were numb. Cold water on the road sprayed up on me, adding insult to injury. After the descent, Yes! The signs for Muir Woods! EPIC! Retracing the route back was easy. Once in Sausalito, I knew I'd be fine, because I could see soccer moms on rented bikes in sweatshirts riding my same direction. I stopped to eat every last Cliff block and drink my last water. Only 10 miles were left at sea level. I could now see the most welcome sight possible - the Golden Gate! One last climb would get me up the hill from the sea level bike path to the bridge deck. I stood out of my saddle in triumph, using every last reserve to hit the final climb in style! Agggh! Debilitating cramp in my left quad! I had to jump off the bike and stand in agony until it stopped. Well, 34-32 it is, then. I inched my way up to the bridge fully seated, humility intact. As soon as I got on the pedestrian walkway, I may or may not have kissed my hand and touched the red steel. I also may have cried. But that could easily have just been sweat. TL;DR

cycling
01. Februar, 08:21 Uhr

One thing I'm bringing back to my riding routine is the wave of appreciation. Whenever a driver demonstrates some patience or common courtesy on the road, I give them a friendly wave. I notice many people attempt to pass safely and I have come to really appreciate the extra space. A simple wave costs me nothing and shows my respect. I used to do this all the time when I was young, but somewhere along the line I stopped. I dawned on me the other day, I need to bring that habit back. With all the fuss and polarization between drivers and cyclists today, it's more important than ever to encourage good behavior. Our lives depend on it. If you don't already do this, I suggest you try it! It feels good and I believe it can make a difference.

cycling
26. April, 12:43 Uhr

So this is a follow up to a couple of posts I made where the consensus seemed to be that I need a bike fit. A couple of you asked me to let you know how it went so this is it. Let me just start by saying....Holy Shit. You all were right, I never expected that my bike could be comfortable. I figured there would always be some inherent discomfort and it was just the nature of riding a road bike. I could not understand how any of you could ride longer than 30 miles and figure you either just suffered better than me or I was broken. For the first time since I owned it...I'm EXCITED to get on the bike. My problems: I was experiencing significant knee pain, one I thought was due to the numerous surgeries I had on it but the other SHOULDN'T have been hurting. The outsides of my feet would cramp. My shoulders would get tight and my neck would hurt. My Hands would go numb along with my junk...the list goes on. My Experience: I made the appointment for after work yesterday and from the second I walked in the door, my fitter Mike, began sizing me up. He gave me his background and has been performing bike fits for 30 years. We discussed the issues I was having and he asked me what I was hoping to get out of this session. He told me of the different types of fitting they did and made a recommendation based on that. He got me set up on the trainer and told me just to ride. I spent about 10 minutes just pedaling while he walked around me checking things out. He immediately went to my handlebars and said "This usually comes later but you look miserable." He proceeded to rotate my bars about 5-6 degrees up...and I experienced INSTANT relief in my hands and wrists. I couldn't believe one tiny change would make such a difference. It was just the beginning. We spent the next couple hours tweaking, pedaling, measuring, and laying on the massage table measuring my knees. He was very concerned with my knees. He proceeded to start adjusting my cleats and once he got those where he wanted them the pressure was off the sides of my feet! He said he couldn't believe he didn't need to shim. The remainder of the time was focused on the seat placement and angle. One thing I didn't understand how to execute, based on the feedback you all provided, was how to use my core to support my weight. There was NO way I could do it. I was so cramped up to the bars that I was riding like a hunch back. He moved the seat up about an inch and back almost 2. This relieved even more pressure off my wrists and put more weight on my sit bones. I was now stretched out enough I could just kind of float on the hoods while my abs/back held me up. Next was the rotation of the saddle. I recently replaced the stock Toupe' with a Power saddle due to my numbness issues and pressure I had on my perineum. I told him I was bummed out because I thought that would solve my problem but it didn't and I spent 160 bucks on a saddle I didn't need. He made me go for about a 15 minute ride with all the changes he made up to this point. When I came back I told him that it felt like I had more weight on my sit bones but still had pressure behind my nads. He tweaked the seat angle 3-4 more times until the pressure was 100 percent gone. The whole process took about two hours and I am absolutely amazed by the results. This is the best money I have spent on the bike hands down. I was dreading the fondo coming up next weekend as I was never able to make it past about 30 miles before due to pain or numbness. Now I can't freaking wait. The bike is actually comfortable. I never thought it would be possible. I want to give Mike at Chainwheel Drive in Clearwater FL a shout out. He did an amazing job and I can't wait to go back for my follow ups and tell him how it's going. I'm a believer now. The best money you can spend on your bike is a fit. Hands down. No discussion. It changes everything and actually makes you want to be on it. [Edit] Typos.

cycling
20. Mai, 12:55 Uhr

I'm very new to road bikes. I've had a mountain bike for years, and about a year ago started getting into longer rides, so I just recently bought my first road bike. The shop I where I bought the bike was really adamant that I should buy proper road bike shoes with cleats and pedals, despite the fact that I had never used them before. I put my foot down (so to speak) and had them sell me a pair of flat pedals (a relatively cheap pair of Wellgos) along with it so I'd have a safety net to at least get me started. I've been riding the new bike for about 2 weeks and after some initial growing pains I love it (it's a BMC Teammachine ALR01). I took it for a 30 mile ride (which at this point is a pretty short trip for me) with the flat pedals and my normal running shoes that I've been cycling with for years, and noticed that I was developing hot spots (some numbness and tingling) on the balls of my feet, just like the guy at the bike shop said would happen. So me being the kind of person that likes to do things the right way, I swapped out the pedals for the fancy road pedals (Look Keo Classic 2's), threw on the shoes and took off on a test ride, fully resigned to the fact that I was going to fail some but it would be okay. Holy crap did I hate it. I haven't dumped a bike that many times since I got my training wheels off. Scraped up my legs. Tore my brand new saddle. All together it turned something I love into an unsafe and nerve-wracking experience to the point where I'm honestly disappointed in myself for getting talked into it against my better judgement. Finally got back home and changed the pedals back to the Wellgos immediately. Am I being ridiculous for wanting to walk away from the whole pedal and cleat system this soon, or is this really just not for everyone? Is my alternative just finding a sneaker with a stiff sole? Furthermore, am I wrong for being kind of pissed at the bike shop for pushing this on me?

cycling
19. November, 19:47 Uhr

TBH honest I don't plan on getting rollers. I just need to get some excercise in this winter and I don't trust my body to cross country ski on my own as often as I'd like, so I'm going to get a trainer. Suggestions? I'm looking at this: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/ca/en/elite-supercrono-mag-force-volare-bundle/rp-prod134952 Which seems like a good deal.

cycling
07. Oktober, 12:51 Uhr

So I posted about a week ago here asking for people's opinions on this steel folding bike with lousy components I was going to buy new on Amazon, everyone said don't do it, and buy a good used road bike instead. Well I listened and scored a made in USA Cannondale CAAD8 R800 Aluminum Optimo frame with ultegra/105/dura ace mixed groupset, carbon fork, bars n seat post, spd/sl pedals, bike computer, all tuned, all in mint/like new condition (original owner, bike had been kept inside/babied), rode it home from sale and been riding everyday since. It's furiously fast, light and a blast to ride/fly, best $440 I ever spent. I love it. This was about the same price as the crappy new bike on Amazon (although gotta love Amazon for the good stuff they do sell, prices, and their stellar no hassle prime return policy). So for anyone else out there looking for a GOOD new bike, but don't want to pay new bike price, there are a lot of quality used bikes out there for really good prices if you look.

cycling
18. Dezember, 17:47 Uhr

EDIT: Got a taker, this will be sent out in the mail tomorrow. Thanks everyone. Wish I had more than just one! Hopefully people are inspired to donate some of their unused gear here as well. ORIGINAL POST: I'm hardly a size medium, but got this weirdo 2XL biking outfit from a colleague. Has lots of Livall branding on it. Totally unused and never been tried on. Just want to let it get some use. I'll even pay shipping if in US. ~~If you want it please PM me. I'll send it to the first person that wants it.~~ Happy holidays! http://imgur.com/nnWYY4e

cycling
01. März, 03:47 Uhr

Two weeks ago I signed up for a 120km cycling event. I've never ridden that far in one session before so I've been training by commuting to work, adding kms each week, and going on a long ride on the weekends. I'm finding my thinking has shifted in the last couple of weeks. Distances no longer seem daunting. My commute home is only 6km; yesterday it took 30km. I have several appointments this week, which I would normally have driven to, but I'm now planning on cycling to. I have an RPG game on Friday night, so I'm test fitting my books into my backpack and strapping on a more powerful front light. I rode up a hill the other day, twice, for fun...

cycling
02. März, 22:52 Uhr

Title says most of it. I'm going on a pretty long bike ride this summer. 60 miles a day, broken up into two 3 hour chunks. Anybody gone on an extended tour? What are some things you found out on the road that I could prepare for ahead of time? Any good online resources I can look into for preparation? Any other general tips? Please let me know! **Edit** I forgot to ask: what do you do for directions? Paper maps? I'd like turn by turn so I don't have to stop every mile to figure out what road next. Any good gps or smart watch recommendations?

cycling
02. Februar, 03:25 Uhr

If you ever need to save your bike from a bike rack and someone mistakes you for a thief, you can prove your ownership with the picture.

cycling
17. März, 21:19 Uhr

As the title says, I participated in my first ever race today. It was the Carondelet Park criterium, which is a part of the tour of St. Louis. I raced the cat 4/5 race, since there wasn’t an only cat 5. Race summary: started out well positioned in the pack. The pace was on pretty hard, but I felt a little sketchy railing a corner that came after a descent that we were hitting fast. On the second or third lap, don’t remember which, we were going into that corner and I had to brake, as the guy in front of me was braking. The guy behind me either didn’t brake hard enough or wasn’t focused or something, but I felt my back wheel get knocked and heard the unmistakeable sound of a bike sliding and the guy hitting the ground. My race was basically over after that. While I didn’t fall down or even turn around, I had to slow up to keep myself upright, and the rest of the pack that was behind me flew by and I was dropped. I solo time trialed for the next 15-20 minutes, at my absolute max, when I started to run into more stragglers. I worked with some off an on, kept moving up through guys who got dropped, but eventually I was lapped. I hung on to the back of the pack for a lap or two before being dropped (honestly I just allowed myself to get dropped, since I knew my race was over) in that one corner from before. I didn’t get pulled, and finished the race, but it didn’t go as planned. I know the whole “it’s your first race” thing, but I’m genuinely bummed, as I’ve put in a lot of work since I’ve started cycling. I think I need more time, since I didn’t get a road bike till last May, which is when I started taking cycling seriously. I also need to work on my cornering and group riding skills. One area that bummed me out was my mentality, since as soon as I got dropped I instantly felt this feeling of defeat. I told myself I was at least gonna finish, which I did, but still. I apologize for the length, but I don’t have too many cycling enthusiast friends to hear my story, so I put it all in this overly extensive post.

cycling
01. Mai, 13:45 Uhr

Bicyclists who litter. If you have to change out a tube, don't just leave the old tube laying around. And particularly not if there's a trash can less than 20 yards away.

cycling
27. Februar, 03:27 Uhr

I'm around 320 lbs. / 5'4" and I'm 27 (female), I never learned how to ride a bike. However, I live in the city now and I really would like to ride a bike with my husband (who is willing to teach me). I've never been good with balance and never been sporty. Is it too late for me to learn?

cycling
10. März, 17:45 Uhr

This is awesome - a lot like I felt my first time out, even the part about getting flipped off: http://www.nascar.com/en_us/news-media/articles/2017/3/7/dale-earnhardt-jr-jimmie-johnson-bicycle-riding-fitness.html

cycling
03. Juli, 13:41 Uhr

Mods, please remove if this is inappropriate. A friend I had in college was killed yesterday in a hit and run accident. Edit: He worked at Bikestock. If anyone was in the area or has any information, please contact NYPD. http://nypost.com/2016/07/02/cyclist-killed-in-hit-and-run/ I hadn't seen him in years, but a mutual friend had caught up with him and I said we would have to come check out his place the next time we were in New York. We are all very saddened by this. Matt was so much fun to be around and lived life to the fullest. Going on a nice ride, having a cocktail after and listening to some metal (he used to host a great radio show) might be an appropriate thing to do today. Please feel free to repost to relevant subreddits (let me know where they go please so I can follow them) or suggest other subreddits...maybe a Brooklyn sub? Thank you for any help or support.

cycling
22. Februar, 23:01 Uhr

hi all! I want to start cycling but I have very strong anxiety. Going out is hard, especially if I try to do any kind of physical activity, and the fact that I'm obese doesn't help. I would like to start indoors and be more comfortable with the activity before starting to go out. If I understand correctly the best option would be buying a bike and a trainer, but I have no idea how much I should spend, what kind of bike/trainer I should get, nothing. I'm watching videos and reading online but I'm still confused. For example, should I care about the quality of the bike If I'm going to just use it on a trainer? I'd love any advice. Thanks and sorry for the stupid question.

cycling
18. Februar, 15:19 Uhr

Ok, this may be long so I apologize in advance. Yesterday a fellow cyclist was injured behind my house on a walking/cycling trail because a neighbor left their back door open and their dog ran after and in front of the cyclist causing her to crash. I watch momentarily as the cyclist was regaining her senses and the dog owner consoling and asking if she were okay. The cyclist was pretty banged up and turned out her derailleur was bent. At this point I stepped outside and offered my assistance. Sat her down on my patio and took a look at the bike. After some ibuprofen and a water, I ask the woman if I can give her a ride to her car or home. She accepted, and I told her I would meet her around front with the car and stow her bike. In the mean time I advised she get the dog owners information for damages. To which she replied, "How do I ask for that?" "There is no easy way to ask." I told her. But your bike was damaged and the injuries may turn out to be more later when the adrenaline and shock wear off. My question is because this was a dog attack, should we have called police? Should she walk in a police report later? Who else needs notified, perhaps the city of a dog that likes to attack people? Thanks for you help! Edit: I say "attack" because this is what the cyclist was saying happened. The collision was out of my line of site.

cycling
01. Juli, 01:53 Uhr

Found something on my Facebook timeline from far-far ago - http://surlybikes.com/blog/post/some_answers_to_just_about_any_bike_forum_post_ive_ever_read/

cycling
04. Mai, 19:37 Uhr

I saw the most beautiful bike I've ever seen today at a set of lights in London. I don't even know what it was, I think it began with F. It was white, black and purple and had the sexiest seat post ever and oh god it made me want to touch myself. I stared and drooled a lot, and then looked up to be greeted by the dirtiest look ever because it basically just looked like I was eye groping the shit out of her arse. I'm sorry Lady in London today I swear I was just admiring your bike.

cycling
21. Februar, 15:13 Uhr

I really wish I had a helmet cam because it finally happened - my first injury due to a impatient driver! Cycling on my way home from work, was over taken with little space given on approach to a traffic light. Car then cut up in front of me and light turned red leading them to suddenly brake in front of me. Even though I was slowing down due to the light being amber I panicked and squeezed my brakes so hard I flipped over my handlebars, hitting myself with them and winding myself and hit the car. Driver did nothing as I wheezed on the floor and dragged myself to the safety of a path. They then drove off as soon as light changed green, no one got out to help me! Haven't wanted to go out since...how do you mentally recover from such a scare???

cycling
15. März, 18:34 Uhr

I just wanted to take a moment and say that after a 6 month break from cycling due to a manic work schedule (loads of international travel) I finally got back onto the saddle today. Damn it feels good, my legs burn and I smashed two PR's on a little 20km run in for the bike. Poor thing was in need of some TLC but that's it, hooked! Can't wait for tomorrow when I can get back on again.

cycling
09. April, 21:08 Uhr

Summary of my day

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